What parts of our anatomy reflect changes for bipedal locomotion

What parts of our anatomy reflect changes for bipedal locomotion

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1. What parts of our anatomy reflect changes for bipedal locomotion? What are these changes? Couple might Bipedal locomotion was caused by many skeletal and muscle changes that occurred during the evolution of Homo sapines. The anthropologists, by comparing and contrasting the anatomic similarities and differences between humans and apes, drew conclusions and explained the anatomic basis of bipedalism. One of the skeletal changes that caused bipedalism is the knee. Our knee joints are locked and stabilized when extended. Other primates do not have this trait. The human head is balanced with the vertebral column, which has curves. The curve that is the most responsible for bipedalism is lumbar curve. The spinal curves ensure balance between the trunk and pelvis. The human pelvic ilium is relativity shorter and broader compared to the apes’ and other primats’. These kinds of modifications changed the center of gravity in the human body giving us an opportunity to walk upright using just two legs. The muscles also changed. The upper leg is composed of muscles
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2010 for the course ANTHROPOLO 101 taught by Professor Michelleraleigh during the Fall '09 term at Los Angeles Valley College.

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