Lectures_Jan_29

Lectures_Jan_29 - is V lc ua k lic a h C C u m m o tM di 2...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/25/10 Visual communication Chapter 2: Part 2: Art 1001
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2/25/10 Visual communication How the artist interprets the subject is more important than the subject Composition Materials Used Technique What is emphasized or not
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2/25/10 Art and Appearances “Art involves interpretation rather than replication.” “Artists invite viewers to see beyond mere appearances.”
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2/25/10 Representational art Also referred to as “objective or figurative” The most “real” looking are referred to as trompe l’oeil (pronounced “tromp loy”) or French for “Fool the eye.” William Harnett, A Smoke Backstage, 1877. Oil on canvas.
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2/25/10 Representational art René Margritte, The Treason of Images, 1929. Oil on canvas.
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2/25/10 Abstract art Can mean either 1. Works of art that have no reference to natural objects. 2. Works that depict natural objects in simplified, distorted, or exaggerated ways.
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2/25/10 Theo van Doesburg, Abstraction of a Cow, 1916. Oil on Canvas.
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2/25/10 Nonrepresentational art Piet Mondrian, Lozenge in Red, Yellow, and Blue , oil o/canvas, 1925
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2/25/10 Nonrepresentational art Mondrian painted hundreds of these abstract compositions, but each one feels unique and original. It is also impressive how well this imagery has held up over the years compared with other 20th Century Nonrepresentational Art
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2/25/10 Form vs content Form-The physical characteristics of a work of art. Content-The meaning or message of a work of art.
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2/25/10 Form vs content Auguste Rodin, The Kiss, 1886. Marble. Constantin Brancusi, The Kiss , 1916. Limestone.
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2/25/10 iconography Iconography – The symbolic meaning of signs, subjects, and images. Iconography is often the key to unlocking the meaning of an artwork and intention of the artist. What iconography does Frank discuss? Memento mori – Latin for “Remember, You must die.” Albrecht Dürer, Knight, Death, & the Devil , 1513. Engraving.
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2/25/10 iconography Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima , 1972. Mixed media. What is Aunt Jemima being liberated from?
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2/25/10 iconography Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima , 1972. Mixed media. Curiosity about the unknown has no boundaries. Symbols, images, place and cultures merge. time slips away. The stars, the cards, the mystic vigil may hold the answers. By shifting the point of view an inner spirit is released. Free to create. Betye Saar 1998
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2/25/10 iconography Another contemporary artist that appropriates stereotypical images is Michael Ray Charles He is from Lafayette, LA and graduated from McNesse State in Lake Charles http://video.pbs.org/video/12376017 Michael Ray Charles , (Forever Free) Elvis Lives!, 1996. Mixed Media
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2/25/10 iconography Michael Ray Charles , (Forever Free) Elvis Lives!, 1996. Mixed Media Andy Warhol , Elvis I, 1964. Silk screen on canvas.
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/25/10 Visual elements Chapter 3: Art 1001
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2/25/10 Visual elements Picture Plane- The flat picture surface.
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2/25/10 Goals of this chapter Name the elements of art.
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