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ccsyllabusspring2010

ccsyllabusspring2010 - Contemporary Western Civilization I...

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Contemporary Western Civilization II Columbia University Spring 2010 206 Broadway T/Th 6:10-8PM Instructor: Abby Kluchin [email protected] Office Hours: Th 2-4 and by appointment in the Teaching Fellows Room at 80 Claremont Course Description The central purpose of “Contemporary Civilization” or “CC” is to introduce students to a range of issues concerning the kinds of communities— political, social, moral, and religious—that human beings construct for themselves and the values that inform and define such communities; the course is intended to prepare students to become active and informed citizens. Founded in 1919 as a course on War and Peace Issues, Contemporary Civilization has evolved continuously, while remaining a constant and essential element of the Columbia College curriculum. The course asks students to read closely texts in various traditions of argument and to construct arguments of their own, both in speech and in writing, about some of the explicit and implicit issues these texts raise. Required Texts Rousseau,  The Basic Political Writings  (Hackett)          Smith,  Wealth of Nations  (Modern Library)                             Hume,  An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals  (Hackett)            Kant,  Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals  (Cambridge)           Burke,  Reflections on the Revolution in France  (Oxford)           Wollstonecraft,  A Vindication of the Rights of Woman  (Dover)          Tocqueville,  Democracy in America  (Penguin)                                                    Hegel,  Introduction to the Philosophy of History  (Hackett)                             Mill,  On Liberty and Other Essays  (Oxford)           Marx-Engels Reader  (Norton)              Darwin,  On the Origin of Species   and  Descent of Man   (Broadview)           Nietzsche,  On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo  (Vintage)           Du Bois,  The Souls of Black Folk  (Dover) Freud , Civilization and Its Discontents  (Norton) de Beauvoir,  The Second Sex  (Vintage) Foucault,  Discipline and Punish  (Vintage) Books are available at the Columbia University bookstore and on reserve at Butler Library. We will also use a variety of materials from CC Web, which you can find online
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