PofS3 - Peter of Spain Summaries of Logic Chapter 3 On...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Peter of Spain Summaries of Logic Chapter 3 On Predicaments 1a. While stating certain preliminaries as necessary for knowledge of predicaments, we first distinguish three ways of predicating , along with Aristotle: of items that are said, then, some are equivocal, while others are univocal but others are denominative. Those are equivocal that have a common name and, in regard to that name, the account of the substance is different: for example, when animal signifies a real animal and a painted animal, the name is common to them but, in regard to that name, the account of each substance is different. Those are called univocal of which there is a common name and, in regard to that name, the account of the substance is the same: for example, the name animal is common to man and ox, and likewise, in regard to that name, its account is the same. 1b. Denominatives are said to be any that get their designation from something else, differing only by termination in regard to that name, as when grammatical comes from grammar . They differ only by a termination in other words, only by an ending apart from the thing and they get their designation in regard to that name. In its beginning, then, a denominative name must coincide with a univocal name, like grammar and grammatical, white and whiteness. Sortes is white: white is the name of a color-quality, but Sortes is a man, not a color; Sortes is called white denominatively, by a name white, but not by its account; he is not called white by the account of whiteness, as he would be called man by the account of humanity; the word white is denominative from the word whiteness; the two words differ only by a termination, -ness Sortes is called white because he has whiteness in him, in the way that a separable accident is in a substance; whiteness is in the category of quality; I cannot say Sortes is whiteness but I can say, denominatively, Sortes is white; most predications of quality are denominative 2a. Of things that are said , some are said without combining , like man or runs, and others are said by combining , like a man runs. But before subdividing the second part of this division, we must distinguish the ways of being-in , which are necessary for understanding the division that follows and for certain statements that will be made later THE TEN CATEGORIES are categories of things said without combining; to understand them, first distinguish ways of being-in ; white is said without combining; Sortes is white is said by combining: white is said of Socrates; how is white in Sortes?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/24/2010 for the course PHILOSOPHY 100B taught by Professor Copenhaver during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 88

PofS3 - Peter of Spain Summaries of Logic Chapter 3 On...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online