example1 - Right hemispheric bias and left visual field...

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Right hemispheric bias and left visual field 1. superiority: The effects of gender, handedness and mood Course: PSYC1011: Psychology 1B Assignment: Tutorial Research Report: ‘Right hemispheric bias and left visual field superiority: The effects of gender, handedness and mood on the perception of chimeric faces’ Name: Jane Student Student Number: 3 456789 Course: Bachelor of Psychology For: Psychology Office Submitted: 4pm, 13 October 200 0
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Right hemispheric bias and left visual field 2. superiority: The effects of gender, handedness and mood Abstract In our free-viewing chimeric faces task, in which a right hemispheric (RH) bias was indicated by judging chimeric faces with the smile on the left side of the face to be happier than faces where the smile is on the right side (a left visual field dominance in the judgments of the faces), it was found that while there was a general left visual field (LVF) superiority evident throughout the entire sample, it was seen to a greater extent amongst females relative to males, and when judging female faces compared to male faces. Right-handers were also found to exhibit a greater LVF superiority than non-right handers (left-handers and ambilaterals). Despite our own predictions, subjective mood was found to play no role in the strength of LVF superiority, though there was a positive correlation between self-reported mood and how happy the chimeric faces were rated to be.
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Right hemispheric bias and left visual field 3. superiority: The effects of gender, handedness and mood Right hemispheric bias and left visual field superiority: The effects of gender, handedness and mood on the perception of chimeric faces Previous research into the perception of emotion has highlighted how this cognitive ability is influenced by a multitude of factors. A number of biological, social and environmental variables help determine our ability to judge the emotional state of others and, more specifically, the magnitude of emotion we perceive them to be expressing. There is a general consensus amongst scientists that the two hemispheres of the brain are each specialised in the performance of different tasks. In general terms, the left hemisphere governs speech and other verbal tasks (Baron, 2001), while the right hemisphere specialises in the performance of visuo-spatial tasks and the comprehension and communication of emotion (Baron, 2001; Habib, 1998; Ladavas, when perceiving emotion, stimuli that activate our right hemisphere are going to more greatly influence our judgments than those that stimulate activity in our left Because the perception of emotion is a highly visual task, any right
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2010 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 100B taught by Professor Firstenberg,i. during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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example1 - Right hemispheric bias and left visual field...

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