NOTES_FOR_EXAM_III

NOTES_FOR_EXAM_III - CHAPTER 10 UNDERSTANDING WORK TEAMS

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CHAPTER 10 – UNDERSTANDING WORK TEAMS Why Have Teams Become So Popular? o Twenty years ago, it made news because no one else was doing it. Today, it is the  organization that does not use teams that has become newsworthy.  o The current popularity of teams seems based on the evidence that teams typically  outperform individuals when the tasks being done require multiple skills, judgment,  and experience.  o As organizations have restructured, they have turned to teams to better utilize  employee talents.  o The motivational properties of teams = significant factor. The role of employee  involvement as a motivator—teams facilitate employee participation in operating  decisions.  Differences between Groups and Teams o Groups and teams are not the same thing.   In the last chapter, we defined a  group  as “two or more individuals,  interacting and interdependent, who have come together to achieve  particular objectives.”  A work group is a group that interacts primarily to share information and to  make decisions to help each member perform within his or her area of  responsibility.  Work groups have no need or opportunity to engage in collective  work that requires joint effort. Their performance is the summation of  each group member’s individual contribution.  There is no positive synergy.  A work team generates positive synergy through coordinated effort.  Individual efforts result in a level of performance that is greater than the sum  of those individual inputs.  o Management is looking for that positive synergy that will allow their organizations to  increase performance.  o The extensive use of teams creates the potential for an organization to generate  greater outputs with no increase in inputs. Merely calling a group a team doesn’t  automatically increase its performance.  Types of Teams A. Problem-Solving Teams 
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o Twenty years ago, teams were just beginning to grow in popularity and most took  similar form. They are typically composed of 5–12 hourly employees from the same  department who met for a few hours each week to discuss ways of improving quality,  efficiency, and the work environment.  o Members share ideas or offer suggestions on how work processes and methods can  be improved. Rarely are they given the authority to unilaterally implement their  suggested actions.  o One of the most widely practiced applications during the 1980s was quality circles.  B. Self-Managed Work Teams  o Problem-solving teams did not go far enough in getting employees involved in work- related decisions and processes. This led to experimentation with truly autonomous 
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2010 for the course FINA 4310 taught by Professor Impson during the Spring '10 term at North Texas.

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NOTES_FOR_EXAM_III - CHAPTER 10 UNDERSTANDING WORK TEAMS

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