159_325_spring_08_chapt_12_part_2

159_325_spring_08_chapt_12_part_2 - Chapter 12 Part 2...

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Ch 12 part 2 1 Chapter 12 – Part 2 Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes
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Ch 12 part 2 2 Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes 12.1 An Overview of Physical States and Phase Changes 12.2 Quantitative Aspects of Phase Changes 12.6 The Solid State: Structure, Properties, and Bonding pp. 449-454, middle p. 456-460
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Ch 12 part 2 3 ATTRACTIVE FORCES electrostatic in nature Intra molecular forces bonding forces These forces exist within within each molecule. They influence the chemical chemical properties of the substance. Inter molecular forces nonbonding forces These forces exist between between molecules. They influence the physical physical properties of the substance. Section 12.1
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Ch 12 part 2 4 Heating Curve for H 2 O The temperature of the solid increases as it is heated … … until the solid begins to melt, at which time the temperature remains constant … … until all the solid is melted, at which time the temperature again rises. Heat added Section 12.2
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Ch 12 part 2 5 Cooling Curve for H 2 O The liquid water cools until … … the freezing point is reached, at which time the temperature remains constant as solid forms. Once all of the liquid has solidified, the temperature again drops. If the liquid is cooled carefully, it can supercool. Heat removed
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Ch 12 part 2 6 Within a phase, a change in heat is accompanied by a change in temperature which is associated with a change in average E k as the most probable speed of the molecules changes. Quantitative Aspects of Phase Changes - CONTINUED During a phase change, a change in heat occurs at a constant temperature, which is associated with a change in E p , as the average distance between molecules changes. q = (amount)(molar heat capacity)( Δ T) q = (amount)(enthalpy of phase change)
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Ch 12 part 2 7 Typical Exam Problem 9 Consider a heating curve for a sample of water. Assume that heat is added to the sample at a constant rate. The specific heat capacity of ice is 2.09 J/g C. The heat of fusion of ice is 6.02 kJ/mol. X. What is the slope of the heating curve’s portion
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159_325_spring_08_chapt_12_part_2 - Chapter 12 Part 2...

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