CH_3 - Biological Molecules Chapter 3 Importance of Carbon...

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Biological Molecules Chapter 3
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Importance of Carbon Carbon permeates the world of life –  from the energy-requiring activities and  structural organization of cells, to  physical and chemical conditions that  span the globe and influence  ecosystems… It is EVERYWHERE!!!
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Carbon’s Bonding Behavior  Outer shell of  carbon has 4  electrons  Each carbon atom  can form covalent  bonds with up to 4  atoms 
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Methane: Simplest Organic  Compound H H H H C
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Most Biological Molecules  are Carbon Based Versatility: forms 4 covalent bonds Organic molecules = C + H Only made by living things
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Double Bonds Rings
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Humans and Global Warming Fossil fuels are rich in carbon  Use of fossil fuels releases CO2 into  atmosphere  Increased CO2 may contribute to global  warming 
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Hemoglobin Molecular Models 
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Organic Compounds Hydrogen and other elements (listed  below) covalently bonded to carbon  - Carbohydrates  - Lipids - Proteins  - Nucleic acids  
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Bonding Arrangements Carbon atoms can  form chains or rings Other atoms project  from the carbon  backbone  Glucose (ball-and-stick model)
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Functional Groups Atoms or clusters of atoms that are  covalently bonded to carbon backbone  Give organic compounds their different  properties Organic vs. Inorganic in Chemistry  Organic  refers to molecules containing a  carbon skeleton  Inorganic  refers to carbon dioxide and all  molecules without carbon
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Examples of Functional Groups Methyl group                       -  CH3 Hydroxyl group                    - OH Amino group                        -  NH3+ Carboxyl group                    -  COOH
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How Are Organic  Molecules  Synthesized?
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Organic molecules in ALL  living orgs share two similarities 1. Use same functional groups  2. Formed by the modular approach         - stick subunits together like cars in train Monomer Dimer Polymer (single unit) (double) (many)
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2010 for the course BIOL 1001 taught by Professor Minor during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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CH_3 - Biological Molecules Chapter 3 Importance of Carbon...

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