Lecture%202

Lecture%202 - Lecture 2 Why Membranes Form compartments...

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Lecture 2
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Why Membranes? Form compartments, which enclose aqueous spaces Permits optimization of conditions for biochemical reactions Provide for physical separation of substrates and products Separate potentially competing reactions Act a scaffolds Organize biochemical pathways in 2-D and 3-D Allow for vectorial reactions from one side of the membrane to the other
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Universal Properties of Biological Membranes Composed of proteins and lipids –sometimes have attached carbohydrates 2 general classes of proteins (integral and peripheral; these break down into 5 different types of protein Integral (no attached carbohydrate) Integral (with attached carbohydrate) = glycoprotein Peripheral Glycosylphospholipoprotein Lipoprotein Structurally and functionally asymmetric Form a fluid mosaic bilayer Close back on themselves
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Fluid Mosaic Model
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Outline for Next 2 Lectures Chemical composition of membranes Lipids, micelles, bilayers Properties of membrane proteins Properties of biological membranes
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2010 for the course MCDB 3120 taught by Professor Poyton,ro during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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Lecture%202 - Lecture 2 Why Membranes Form compartments...

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