CS-201_10_Final_Exam_Fall_08-09_Newson

CS-201_10_Final_Exam_Fall_08-09_Newson - CS 201-10 Final...

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CS 201-10 Final Examination Name______________________ 27 January 2009 3pm to 5pm Student No.___________________ Take your time to organise your answers and write clearly. Read each question carefully and make sure you answer the question fully. You may answer the questions in any order, but clearly indicate the number of the question in your exam booklet. Return this exam sheet with your booklet. Time limit: 2 hours. Section A (30%) Answer one of the following: 1. Write a short essay explaining this theme as discussed in The Republic. What are the main conclusions, and how do these fit in within the main philosophical proposal? ‘The first thing we have to agree on, then, is whether these proposals are feasible or not. For, whether it’s asked in joke or in earnest, we must allow people to ask the question: Is the female of the human species naturally capable of taking part in all the occupations of the male, or in none, or in some only? And if in some, is military service one of them? That’s the best way to begin, and the way in which we are most likely to reach a fair conclusion.’ 2. Write a short essay discussing the significance of the following passage in the context of the Aeneid ‘Come now, and I shall tell you of the glory that lies in store for the sons of Dardanus, for the men of Italian stock who will be our descendants, bright spirits that will inherit our name, and I shall reveal to you your own destiny. That young warrior you see there leaning on the sword of valour, to him is allotted the place nearest to the light in this grove, and he will be the first of us to rise into the ethereal air with an admixture of Italic blood.’ Section B (50%) Answer one question 3. Compare and contrast the following passages as a basis for discussion, how do they differ in purpose? How do these works see the divine and do they reflect each author’s philosophy? Life-stirring Venus, Mother of Aeneas and of Rome, Pleasure of men and gods, you make all things beneath the dome Of sliding constellations teem, you throng the fruited earth And the ship-freighted sea – for every species comes to birth Conceived through you, and rises forth and gazes on the light. The winds flee from you, Goddess, your arrival puts to flight
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CS-201_10_Final_Exam_Fall_08-09_Newson - CS 201-10 Final...

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