final-spring2009-Wrisley - American University of Beirut...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: American University of Beirut CVSP 201 — Dr Wrisley Final Exam (2 hours) Percentage of final grade: 40% No books or notes are to be used in this exam. Each part of the exam should not exceed 4 pages of the exam booklet (4 sides of the page). You should write about a total of three authors in this exam. I. Textual analysis. (50 points, 60 minutes) . This part of the exam tests how well you can analyze a piece of text from the reading. Choose one quotation only. Focus on analyzing the main points of the passage and offering an interpretation. Write no more than 4 pages. Do not write an elaborate introduction and conclusion. Be precise and concise. - What is being described or told in the passage? What is the argument or claim being made? 0 What are specific images, language or stylistic features used (refer to line numbers)? Are there repeated words or phrases? 0 What are the main ideas that shape this particular passage? 0 Using this particular piece of text, what can you say about the speaker or about the book that we did not say in class? 0 Do you have a personal opinion about the claims made? A Ethics “But to obtain a right training or goodness from an early age is a hard thing, unless one has been brought up under right laws. For a temperate and hardy (=r0bust) way of life is not a pleasant thing to most people, especially when they are young. For this reason upbringing and occupations should be regulated by law, because they will cease to be irksome (= annoying) when they have become habitual. But presumably it is not enough to have received the right upbringing and supervision in youth; they must keep on observing their regimen and accustoming themselves to it even after they are grown up; so we shall need laws to regulate these activities too, and indeed generally to cover the whole of life; for most people are readier to submit to compulsion and punishment than to argument and fine ideals. This is why some people think that although legislators ought to encourage people to goodness and appeal to their finer feelings, in the hope that those who have had a decent training in their habits will respond, they ought also to inflict chastisement and penalties on any who disobey through deficiency of character, and 10 to deport the incorrigible (=h0peless) altogether. For they hold that while the good man, whose life is related to a fine ideal, will listen to reason, the badone whose object is pleasure must be controlled by pain, like a beast of burden. This is also why they say that the pains inflicted should be those that are most contrary to the favoured pleasures. To resume, however: if as we have said in order to be a good man one must first have been brought up in the right way and trained in the right habits, and must thereafter spend one’s life in reputable occupations, doing no wrong either with or against one’s will: then this can be achieved by living under the guidance of some intelligence or right system that has effective force. Now the orders that a father gives have no forceful or compulsive power, nor indeed have those ofany individual in general, unless he is a king or somebody ofthat son, but law, being the pronouncement of a kind of practical wisdom or intelligence, does have the power of compulsion. And although people resent it when their impulses are opposed by human agents, even if the latter are in the 20 ' ht, the law causes no irritation by en'oining (=directin_ us towards) decent behavior .” 15 B The Nature of Things “Often a man who’s sick and tired ofhis own hearth (=home) will roam / From his roomy mansion, only to come suddenly back home / Because he feels no better when he’s somewhere else. He heads / For his country villa, driving his imported thoroughbreds (=expensive horses) / Hell-for-leather, as though to save a house on fire. And yet / The fellow starts to yawn the very moment he has set / Foot in the door, or falls into a heavy sleep, seeking to drown / In oblivion (=forgetfulness). Or even wants to hotfoot (=rush) back to town. / Thus in this way each man is running from himself, yet still / Because he clings to that same self, although against his will, / And clearly can’t escape from it, he loathes (=hates) it; for he’s ill / But doesn’t grasp the cause of his disease. Could he but see / This clear enough, a man would drop everything else, and study / First to understand the Nature ofThings, for his own sake: / It’s his condition for all time — not for one hour — at stake, / The state in which all mortals should expect themselves to be / After death, for the remainder of eternity. / For what’s this great and wicked lust for living all about, / If it just drives us to distraction, amidst danger and doubt? / The life of mortals has a limit set to it, my friend. / Death has no loopholes. / All of us must meet it in the end. / We go through the same motions in the same old place. No measure / Of added life will ever coin (=invent) for us a novel (=new) pleasure. / True, while we lack that which we long for, it is an obsession; / We are forever panting with an unquenched thirst for life. / No one knows what the years to come will bring — whatjoy or strife / May lie in store for us, what outcome’s looming (=waiting) in our lot (=fate). / But by adding on to life, we don’t diminish by one jot (=small amount) / The length of death, nor are we able to subtract instead / Anything to abbreviate the time that we are dead. / Though you outlive as many generations as you will, / Nevertheless, Eternal Death is waiting for you still. / It is no shorter, that eternity that lies in store/ For the man who with the setting sun today will rise no more, / Than for the man whose sun has set months, even years, before. C Aeneid “As soon as his winged feet touched the roof of a Carthaginian hut, he caught sight of Aeneas laying the foundations ofthe citadel and putting up building. His sword was studded with yellow stars ofjasper (= yellow precious stone), and glowing with Tyrian purple there hung from his shoulders a rich cloak given to him by Dido into which she has woven a fine crossthread of gold. Mercury wasted no time: ‘So now you are laying foundations for the high towers of Carthage and building a splendid city to please your wife? Have you entirely forgotten your own kingdom and your own destiny? The ruler of the gods himself, by whose divine will the heavens and the earth revolve, sends me down from bright Olympus and bids me bring these commands to you through the swift winds. What do you have in mind? What do you hope to achieve by idling away your time in the land of Libya? If the glory of such a destiny does not fire your heart, spare a thought for Ascanius as he grows to manhood, for the hopes of this Iulus who is your heir. You owe him the land of Rome and the kingdom of Italy.’ No sooner had these words passed the lips of the Cylenian god than he disappeared from mortal view and faded far into the insubstantial air. But the sight of him left Aeneas dumb and senseless. His hair stood on end with horro and the voice stuck in his throat. He longed to be away and leave behind him this land he had found so sweet. The warning, the command from the gods, has struck him like a thunderbolt. But what, oh what, was he to do? What words dare he use to approach the queen in all her passion? How could he begin to speak with her? His thoughts moved swifily now here, now there, darting in every possible direction ad turning to every possible event, and as he pondered, this seemed to him a better course of action: he called Mnestheus, Sergestus and brave Serestus and ordered them to fit out the fleet and tell no one, to muster the men on the shore with their equipment at the ready, and keep secret the reason for the change of plan. In the meantime, since the good queen knew nothing and the last thing she expected was the shattering of such a great love, he himself would try to make approaches to her and find the kindest time to speak and the best way to handle the matter. They were delighted to receive their orders and carried them out immediate] II. Comparative essay. (50 points, 1 hour) This part of the exam tests how well you can compare and contrast two authors together. You have been told which authors will be paired together in advanced. Choose one pair only. Write no more than 4 pages. Do not write an elaborate introduction. Be precise and concise and give examples. 0 0.. DO NOT RETELL THE STORY. DO NOT GIVE BACKGROUND MATERIAL ON THE AUTHOR DO NOT WRITE ABOUT ONE AUTHOR AND THEN THE NEXTAUTHOR ORGANIZE YOUR ESSAY BY THEMES. COMPARE AND CONTRAST ALL ALONG. BALANCE YOUR DISCUSSION OF SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES. ‘0 .0 .0 ‘0 .0 ‘0 .0 ‘0 .0 ‘0 1. Homer — Virgil In both Homer’s Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, we find a main hero (Odysseus, Aeneas) and secondary figure (Telemachus, Polyphemus, Dido, Turnus, etc). Compare and contrast the actions of the primary hero with the secondary one. What is the purpose of having this important character next to a lesser one? What do we learn about one from the other? 2. Lucretius — Sophocles Compare and contrast the Lucretian point of view with the tragic one found in Antigone. You might choose to emphasize some ofthe following elements: human choice, the role ofthe gods, fear, the devotion of humans to social or religious order, or the chorus. 3. Aristotle — Plato Some have claimed that one of the main differences between Plato and Aristotle is that Plato stresses understanding one’s place, living and taking care of things, whereas Aristotle focuses on activities that express human reason. Do you agree with this claim? Compare and contrast Plato and Aristotle on what human beings should aim to do in life. What is the ultimate goal for them? 4. Virgil — Sophocles The concept of citizenship (belonging to a city and owing it allegiance) appears most clearly in the interchanges between Creon and Antigone. Compare and contrast what it means to be in support ofa city in Virgil and Sophocles. What is the role ofthe heroic human? What are the obstacles? How do both books resolve the threat of the foreigner? ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern