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final-spring2009-Mejcher-Atassi

final-spring2009-Mejcher-Atassi - Final Exam AUB CVSP 201...

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Unformatted text preview: Final Exam AUB, CVSP 201, Spring 2008/2009, Dr. Sonja Mejcher-Atassi Student’s name: Student’s ID number: Points to remember: 0 The final exam is 40% of your final grade. 0 The time designated for the final exam is 2 hours. Please, use the last 10 minutes for revision. 0 Please, write as legible as possible. 0 Cheating — just like plagiarism — is a serious offence to academic integrity and honesty and is dealt with according to AUB regulations: it results in a failing grade of forty and will be referred to the Dean’s office. Good luck! PART I—- brief definitions and questions (20 points) 1. Briefly describe the relation between Roman and Greek civilizations as represented in Lucretius’ The Nature of Things and Virgil’s The Aeneid. 2. What did Lucretius borrow from Epicurus? CVSP 20] final exam 2 PART II — textual analysis (40 points) Read the text passage carefully and underline key words. Then: 1. Explain the meaning of the text passage (what are its key ideas?) 2. Situate the text passage in the context of the text as a whole (where does it fit into the text and its arguments?) 3. What is the significance of the text passage for the text as a whole? Choice 1: [___________________________________________ Now then listen in order for you to fully comprehend That minds and flimsy spirits have a birthday and an end (...) But do this favour for me just the same , And joke both of these concepts underneath a single name, So that, say, when I speak of spirit, teaching that it dies, Understand I am referring to the mind likewise, Seeing that a single soul is formed out oftheir union. First, because I’ve shown its texture is a gauzy one, And that its particles are tiny ~ tinier for that matter Than are the particles of fog, or smoke, or liquid water — For it is nimbler by far, moves at the slightest jog, Being triggered by mere images of smoke and fog, As for instance, when we’re deep in sleep, and in a dream We look on altars breathing out their smoke and sending steam Aloft. (These images are carried to us, there’s no doubt.) And since you know how when a vase is shattered it pours out All of the liquid it was holding, spilling it everywhere, And since you know how fog and smoke disperse into the air — Trust that the spirit pours and scatters at even greater speed, And it resolves more quickly into its component seed At the instant it departs and flees the body. On the whole, If the body, which is at it were, the vessel of the soul, Made rarefied and leaky by the gouts of blood that drain From veins when it is cracked somehow, no longer can contain The spirit, how can air contain it, when air is a mesh More full of holes than any leaky vessel of the flesh? Lucretius, The Nature of Things, Book III, 417-444. CVSP 201 final exam 3 Choice 2: It was Eumelus who brought the news to the Trojans while they were still in the wedge- shaped blocks of seats in the theatre near the tomb of Anchises, and they could see for themselves the dark ash flying in a cloud. Ascanius was happily leading the cavalry manoeuvres, so he made of to the troubled camp at full gallop although the breathless trainers tried in vain to hold him back. ‘What strange madness is this?’ he cried. ‘Where, 0 where is this leading you, you unhappy women of Troy? This is not the camp of your Greek enemies. What you are burning is your own hopes for the future! Look at me! I am your own Ascanius!’ He had been wearing a helmet as he stirred the images of war in the mock battle and now he took it off and threw it on the ground at his feet. At this moment Aeneas came rushing up and columns of Trojans with him, but the women took to flight and scattered all over the shore making for the woods and caves in the rocks, wherever they could hide. They were ashamed of what they had done and ashamed to look upon the light of day. Their wits were restored now and they recognized their own people. Juno was cast out of their hearts. Virgil, The Aeneid, Book V, 666-679. PART III — essay (40 points), choose one only! 1. Briefly explain the notion of justice in Plato’s Republic. Then compare it to two other texts from our syllabus (one Greek, the other Roman). 2. Briefly explain the notion of intellect in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Then compare it to two other texts from our syllabus (one Greek the other Roman). CVSP 20] final exam CVSP 201 final exam CVSP 201 final exam CVSP 201 final exam ...
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