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final-spring2009-2 - CS 201-5 Final Examination Name 2 June...

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Unformatted text preview: CS 201-5 Final Examination Name 2 June 2009 3pm to 5pm Student No. Take your time to organise your answers and write clearly. Read each question carefully and make sure you answer the question fully. You may answer the questions in any order, but clearly indicate the number of the question in your exam booklet. Return this exam sheet with your booklet. Time limit: 2 hours. Section A (30%) Answer Mg of the following: 1. Write a short essay explaining this theme as discussed in The Republic. What are the main conclusions, and how do these fit in within the main philosophical proposal? ‘There is therefore no administrative occupation which is peculiar to woman as woman or man as man; natural capacities are similarly distributed in each sex, and it is natural for women to take part in all occupations as well as men, though in all women will be the weaker partners.’ ‘Agreed.’ ‘Are we therefore to confine all occupations to men only?’ ‘How can we?’ ‘Obviously we can’t; for we are agreed, I think, that one woman may have a natural ability for medicine or music, another not.’ ‘Yes.’ ‘And one may be good at athletics, another have no taste for them; one be good at soldiering, another not.’ The Republic Book 5: 455d-e 2. Write a short essay naming the speaker and discussing the significance of the following passage in the context of the Aeneid ‘There will come a day, as the years glide by, when the house of Assaracus will reduce Achilles’ Pthia and glorious Mycenae to slavery and will conquer and rule the city of Argos. From this noble stock there will be born a Trojan Caesar to bound his empire by Oceanus at the limits of the world, and his fame by the stars. He will be called Julius, a name passed down to him from the great Iulus. In time to come, have no fear, you will receive him in the sky, laden with spoils from the East.’ The Aeneid Book 1: 282-290 Section B (50%) Answer m question 3. By using the following passages as a basis for discussion write an essay in which you compare and contrast how these works see gods and religion. Do they reflect each author’s philosophy? Life-stirring Venus, Mother of Aeneas and of Rome, Pleasure of men and gods, you make all things beneath the dome Of sliding constellations teem, you throng the fruited earth And the ship-freighted sea — for every species comes to birth Conceived through you, and rises forth and gazes on the light. The winds flee from you, Goddess, your arrival puts to flight The clouds of heaven. For you, the crafty earth contrives sweet flowers, For you, the oceans laugh, the skies grow peaceful after showers, Nature of Things Aeneas was fired by these words from his old friend, but his heart was divided between all his cares as never before. Dark night had risen in her chariot to command the vault of heaven, when suddenly there appeared the form of his father Anchises gliding down from the sky and these were the words that came pouring from him: ‘0 my son, dearer to me than life itself in the days when life remained to me, O my son, who has been tested by the Fates of Troy, I come here in fulfilment of the command of Jupiter. He it was who drove the fire from your ships and has at last looked down from the sky and pitied you.’ The Aeneid 4. Using the following passages as a basis for discussion, compare and contrast how these works define the good and how this might be achieved? “But,” we shall say, “we have bred you both for your own sake and that of the whole community to act as leaders and king-bees in a hive; you are better and more fully educated than the rest and better qualified to combine the practice of philosophy and politics. You must therefore each descend in turn and live with your fellows in the cave and get used to seeing in the dark; once you have got used to it you will see a thousand times better than they do and will distinguish the various shadows, and know what they are shadows of, because you have seen the truth about things admirable and just and good.” The Republic Since moral goodness is concerned with feelings and actions, and those that are voluntary receive praise and blame, whereas those that are involuntary receive pardon and sometimes pity too, students of moral goodness must presumably determine the limits of the voluntary and the involuntary. The Nicomachean Ethics Section C (20%) For each quotation identify the author (if known) and title of the work from which it is taken. 5. In the first light of dawn all my household gathered round me, the children brought pitch and the men whatever was necessary. On the fifth day I laid the keel and the ribs, then made fast the planking. The ground-space was one acre, each side of the deck measured one hundred and twenty cubits, making a square. I built six decks below, seven in all, I divided them into nine sections with bulkheads between. 6. Naturally, therefore we do not speak of an ox or a horse or any other animal as happy, because none of them can take part in this sort of activity. For the same reason no child is happy either, because its age debars it as yet from such activities; if children are so described, it is by way of congratulation on their future promise. For, as we said above, happiness demands not only complete goodness but a complete life. 7. It’s best to flee away from images, and to steer clear from the fodder that love feeds upon — it’s better to direct your attention somewhere else, and spend the fluids that collect on any body — rather than retain them and remain fixed ever on one love, laying up stores of certain pain. 8. On account of this science will be adequate if it achieves such clarity as the subject-matter allows; for the same degree of precision is not to be expected in all discussions, any more than in all products of handicraft. Instances of morally fine and just conduct — which is what politics investigates — involve so much difference and variety that they are widely believed to be such only by convention and not by nature. 9. But of course you want to live for your children’s sake, so that you may be able to bring them up and educate them. Indeed! By first taking them off to Thessaly and making foreigners of them, so that they’ll have that to enjoy too? Or if that is not your intention, supposing that they are brought up here, will they be better cared for and educated because of your being alive, even without you there? 10. “My friend, dreams are things hard to interpret, hopeless to puzzle out, and people find that not all of them end in anything. There are two gates through which the insubstantial dreams issue. One pair of gates is made of horn, and one of ivory.” 11. But the queen — who can deceive a lover? — knew in advance some scheme was afoot. Afraid where there was nothing to fear, she was the first to catch wind of their plans to leave, and while she was already in a frenzy, that same wicked Rumour brought word that the Trojans were fitting out their fleet and preparing to sail away. Driven to distraction and burning with passion, she raged and raved round the whole city like a Bacchant stirred by the shaking of the sacred emblems and roused to frenzy when she hears the name of Bacchus 12. Land of Thebes, city of all my fathers — 0 you gods, the first gods of the race! They drag me away, now, no more delay. Look on me, you noble sons of Thebes — the last of a great line of kings, 1 alone, see what I suffer now at the hands of what breed of men — all for reverence, my reverence for the gods! 13. For certainly all men are in the clutches of a dread — beholding many things take place in heaven overhead or here on earth whose causes they can’t fathom, they assign the explanation for these happenings to powers divine. Nothing can be made from nothing — once we see that’s so, already we are on the way to what we want to know: what can things be fashioned from? And how is it, without the machinations of the gods, all things can come about? 14. Suppose one of them were let loose, and suddenly compelled to stand up and turn his head and look and walk towards the fire; all these actions would be painful and he would be too dazzled to see properly the objects of which he used to see shadows. What do you think he would say if he was told that what he used to see was so much empty nonsense and that he was now nearer reality and seeing more correctly ...
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