Section 3 - Labor Relations

Section 3 - Labor Relations - Part3LaborRelationsinSports

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The Business of Sports Part 3 - Labor Relations in Sports The interactions between players and owners  concerning employment, pay and benefits,  and the negotiating environment Labor relations in sports have come a long  way since Marvin Miller took over the MLBPA  in 1966 Before free agency, owners had all the power the story of Jim Ringo and Vince Lombardi Collective bargaining between the owners and  the players’ union Has led to a leveling of the “playing field”
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Collective Bargaining Collective bargaining consists of negotiations between  an employer and a group of employees so as to  determine the conditions of employment.  The result of collective bargaining procedures is a  collective bargaining agreement (CBA).  Employees are often represented in bargaining by a  union or other labor organization.  Collective bargaining is governed by federal and state  statutory laws, administrative agency regulations, and  judicial decisions.
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National Labor  Relations Act (NLRA) The main body of law governing collective  bargaining is the National Labor Relations Act  (NLRA) NLRA explicitly grants employees the right to  collectively bargain and join trade unions NLRA establishes procedures for the selection of a  labor organization to represent a unit of employees in  collective bargaining NLRA is administered by the National Labor Relations  Board (NLRB)
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NLRA The NLRA requires the employer to bargain with  the appointed representative of its employees.  It does not require either side to agree to a  proposal or make concessions but does  establish procedural guidelines on good faith  bargaining.  Proposals which would violate the NLRA or  other laws may not be subject to collective  bargaining.  The NLRA also establishes regulations on what  tactics (e.g. strikes, lock-outs, picketing) each 
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Arbitration Arbitration is a method of dispute resolution used as an  alternative to litigation  Commonly designated in collective bargaining as the  way to resolve disputes  The parties select a neutral third party (an arbiter) to hold  a formal or informal hearing on the disagreement  The arbiter hears a case and issues a decision binding on the  parties Most important arbitration case in sports labor relations:  Messersmith and McNally vs. MLB Owners, 1975
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Grievance Procedure A formal grievance procedure is a  standardized set of procedures to follow  when someone has a complaint or a problem There are two key factors in establishing a workable 
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Section 3 - Labor Relations - Part3LaborRelationsinSports

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