Bipolar Disorder - Bipolar Disorder: The 1 Bipolar...

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Bipolar Disorder: The 1 Bipolar Disorder: The Discovery, the Treatment, and the Preservation Stephany Boles University of Phoenix-Axia College
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Bipolar Disorder: The 2 Bipolar Disorder, also known as manic-depressive disease, is a disorder of the brain that can cause abnormal changes in mood, vigor, degree of endeavor, and the capability of dealing with everyday life. The symptoms of bipolar disorder are different from the normal cycle of ups and downs that are experienced every so often. Bipolar disorder is more severe in nature. Bipolar disorder is often unrecognized for years before a diagnosis is accurately made. The symptoms of bipolar disorder can put a damper on personal relationships, work performance, and inadequate functioning in school or group settings. The first step of acquiring getting a proper diagnosis is talking to a family doctor. The doctor may conduct a series of tests to rule out possibilities for other contributing factors such as strokes or brain tumors. If the problems are not cause by any other illness, the doctor may perform a complete mental evaluation. From that point, the psychian may make a referral to a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist, who has experience in diagnosing and treating bipolar disorder. The mental health specialist should conduct a complete diagnostic assessment. In completing a diagnostic assessment, the psychiatrist will want to know information from the patient such as family history of bipolar disorder or other mental illnesses. According to Oliver (2004-2008), “Research on bipolar indicates that there is a link between genetic or heredity factors and environmental factors.” Those that have a family history of bipolar disorder, depression, or other mental illnesses are more likely to endure a mental disorder. The psychiatrist may also want to speak with relatives to get a complete record of any known history of mental illnesses in the family, and any of the patient’s symptoms recognized by relatives. Other factors the psychiatrist will want to know include any signs and symptoms that the patient may be experiencing. Having that vital information is imperative when diagnosing bipolar disorder. Oliver (2004-2008) states, “Typically doctors look at hypomanic and depressive symptoms for at least two years in order to make a diagnosis.” Information should
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Bipolar Disorder: The 3 also be disclosed to the psychiatrist immediately if there has been a history of suicidal thoughts or attempts made by the patient. In an instance where a careful diagnosis is not made patients could be misdiagnosed with other diseases or disorders. Bipolar Disorder is often misdiagnosed due to lack of information given to psychiatrists.
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2010 for the course AXIA COLLE MAT 116 taught by Professor Herman during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Bipolar Disorder - Bipolar Disorder: The 1 Bipolar...

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