Digital-To-Analog Converter and ADC

Digital-To-Analog Converter and ADC - CHAPTER...

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CHAPTER 13 Digital-to-Analog and Analog-to-Digital Conversions OUTLINE 13.1 Resistor Networks for Digital-to-Analog Conversion 13.2 The TTL Digital-to-Analog Converter 13.3 Analog-to-Digital Conversion Using Voltage Comparators 13.4 The Count-Up and Compare Analog-to-Digital Converter 13.5 The Successive Approximation Analog-to-Digital Converter 13.6 The DAC0830 Digital-to-Analog Converter Integrated Circuit 13.7 Making the Logic for a 3-Bit Voltage Comparator Analog-to-Digital Converter 13.8 Troubleshooting Digital-to-Analog Converters Digital Application Analog-to-Digital Converters LAB 13A Digital-to-Analog and Analog-to-Digital LAB 13B Analog-to-Digital Converters KEY TERMS analog-to-digital binary ladder digital-to-analog flash converter successive approximation 2 R ladder
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OBJECTIVES After completing this chapter, you should be able to: Use resistor networks for digital-to-analog conversion. Explain the operation of a TTL digital-to-analog converter. Use voltage comparators to produce an analog-to-digital converter. Describe the count-up and compare method of analog-to-digital conversion. Describe the successive approximation method of analog-to-digital conversion.
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Y v 13.1 RESISTOR NETWORKS FOR DIGITAL- TO-ANALOG CONVERSION We will look at two resistor networks to do the job of converting a binary number to a proportional analog voltage. The first is the binary ladder. Figure 13-1 shows the binary ladder made with a switch for each binary bit instead of TTL outputs. This will help to simplify the explanation. The binary number which is set by the switches is 1000 or decimal number 8. The largest number that the four switches can express is 1111 or decimal number 15. In this casea1is + 15V ,anda0is ground. Therefore, if the binary number 1111 or decimal number 15 is put on the switches, the output of the binary ladder is tied to the + 15 V supply through all the resistors in parallel, as shown in Figure 13-2. This produces a DIGITAL-TO-ANALOG AND ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERSIONS 487 FIGURE 13-1 The binary ladder D-to-A converter FIGURE 13-2 Binary ladder with all ones on the input
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15 V output voltage. If all the switches are switched to the 0 position, the output is 0 V or ground, as shown in Figure 13-3. Now let us analyze the switch configuration in Figure 13-1. The equivalent cir- cuit is shown in Figure 13-4. If we reduce the circuit to two series-equivalent resistors, the voltage output will be the voltage drop across R B . Using the voltage divider for- mula, we can find the output voltage for the binary number 1000 or decimal number 8 to be 8 V. R B = ++ = 1 1 2 1 4 1 8 1 1429 kk k k ΩΩ . (13-1) VV R RR S B AB OUT = + V OUT V k = + 15 1 1429 1 1 1429 . . V OUT V = 8 The output voltage for the other possible binary number inputs can be computed in a similar manner. You will find the voltage increments to be 1 V for this binary ladder . The binary number equivalent to 10 produces a voltage of 10 volts and the binary number equivalent to 7 produces a voltage of 7 volts. In other words, the supply
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Digital-To-Analog Converter and ADC - CHAPTER...

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