jan12_10 - The Physics of Astronomy(Chapter 4 of Text...

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The Physics of Astronomy (Chapter 4 of Text ) Understanding Motion, Energy, and Gravity
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Announcements All Tutorial Group changes, late registrations, etc. are handled by your College Registrar, who will give you a form to be signed by me. I do that after class, or in my office (any time, contact me, Prof. Mochnacki first). Room AB 127.
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• Assignment 1 closes before midnight tonight. Assignment 2 comes online early tomorrow morning. • Assignment 2 will use material from the first 3 lectures, plus your own reading.
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Term Test The Term Test will now be held on Tues. 2 nd March 2010 at 4.10 pm . Room assignments will be made after Reading Week. The change was necessary because we were being split up into too many rooms, and we have only 20 teaching assistants!
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4.1 Describing Motion Our goals for learning: • How do we describe motion? • How is mass different from weight?
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How do we describe motion? Precise definitions to describe motion: Speed : Rate at which object moves speed = distance time units of m s example: speed of 10 m/s Velocity : Speed and direction example: 10 m/s, due east Acceleration : Any change in velocity units of speed/time (m/s 2 ) (An acceleration may involve change of direction , not “speed” per se)
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The Acceleration of Gravity • All falling objects accelerate at the same rate (not counting friction of air resistance). • On Earth, g ≈ 10 m/s 2 : speed increases 10 m/s with each second of falling.
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The Acceleration of Gravity ( g ) • Galileo showed that g is the same for all falling objects, regardless of their mass.
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Momentum and Force Momentum = mass × velocity • A net force changes momentum, which generally means an acceleration (change in velocity) • Rotational momentum of a spinning or orbiting object is known as angular momentum
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In which case is there NO net force? 1.
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2010 for the course AST AST201 taught by Professor Mochnacki during the Spring '10 term at University of Toronto.

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jan12_10 - The Physics of Astronomy(Chapter 4 of Text...

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