jan19_10 - AST201: 19 Jan. 2010 Announcements Observing...

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AST201: 19 Jan. 2010 Announcements • Observing Sessions: These start this week! .You must sign up, and each night has a maximum of 200 people The links for sign- up (using Google Doodle) will be up on blackboard by 6pm today. • Dates (this week and next, start 6.00 pm): Wed., Thurs., Jan. 20, 21 Mon., Tue., Wed., Jan. 25,26,27 • Location: 16 th Floor, Burton Tower, McLennan Labs (Huron & Russell Streets)
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Links The link to the sign-up for the nights http://www.doodle.com/2r9inbyyz5wdm43m A link to a star map for January you should print out. http://www.skymaps.com/skymaps/tesmn1001.pdf A link to a planisphere you can print out and make. http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/docs/education/NRC_Planisphere_E.pdf
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Observing Sessions • You must attend one observing night during the term to collect 2% participation mark. • Sessions are limited to 200 people, signed up BEFORE each session. • Attendance will be taken using sign-up sheets.
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Tuesday, 19 th January 2010 • What we learn from Light • Thermal Radiation • Doppler Effect • Eyes & Cameras
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5.4 Learning from Light Our goals for learning: • What are the three basic types of spectra? • How does light tell us what things are made of? • How does light tell us the temperatures of planets and stars? • How do we interpret an actual spectrum?
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What are the three basic types of spectra? Continuous Spectrum Emission Line Spectrum Absorption Line Spectrum Spectra of astrophysical objects are usually combinations of these three basic types
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Continuous Spectrum • The spectrum of a common (incandescent) light bulb spans all visible wavelengths, without interruption
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Emission Line Spectrum • A thin or low-density cloud of gas emits light only at specific wavelengths that depend on its composition and temperature, producing a spectrum with bright emission lines
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Absorption Line Spectrum • A cloud of gas between us and a light bulb can absorb light of specific wavelengths, leaving dark absorption lines in the spectrum
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things are made of? Spectrum of the Sun
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2010 for the course AST AST201 taught by Professor Mochnacki during the Spring '10 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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jan19_10 - AST201: 19 Jan. 2010 Announcements Observing...

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