14-COGS11-The Breakdown of Language

14-COGS11-The Breakdown of Language - The Breakdown of...

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The Breakdown of Language Mary ET Boyle, Ph. D. Department of Cognitive Science UCSD
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he story of Luke The story of Luke… A CT scan revealed that Luke had suffered a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), a general term that refers to a stroke or brain hemorrhage as a result of a blockage or rupture f an artery or vein of an artery or vein. In Luke’s case the CVA was a collection of blood within the brain substance of the ferior posterior region of the left frontal lobe inferior posterior region of the left frontal lobe . He was transferred to the neurosurgery ward, and when I saw him only a few hours later , he as desperately trying to spell the words that his lips was desperately trying to spell the words that his lips refused to form, using a communication board of letters and numbers given to him by the speech pathologist. His three friends were sitting around his bed and ith m h h it ti L k looked as frightened as he did. With much hesitation, Luke managed to spell out “ - - - G- - - H- - M- . ” This we translated as “Voice V O C E G O M N H E P M E. This we translated as Voice gone, help me.” Ogden, Jenni A. Fractured Minds : A Case-Study Approach to Clinical Neuropsychology.
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xpressive aphasia Expressive aphasia • Most severe difficulties e in verbal expression rocas are in verbal expression • Ability to comprehend nguage although not Brocas hasia language, although not normal, relatively nimpaired aphasia unimpaired.
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he story of Beth The story of Beth… hd k i t t l Beth’s ability to comprehend spoken or written language was severely impaired , but her spoken language was fluent and, if not attended to closely, sounded almost normal. Anyone attempting to understand Beth’s speech, however, quickly realized that her sentences were often nonsensical. At first, Beth did not appear particularly concerned, perhaps because she was unable to comprehend that her speech was muddled and confused.
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14-COGS11-The Breakdown of Language - The Breakdown of...

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