Mullens_etal_2009_AdaptationGenetics

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doi: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1146 , 3809-3818 first published online 5 August 2009 276 2009 Proc. R. Soc. B Lynne M. Mullen, Sacha N. Vignieri, Jeffery A. Gore and Hopi E. Hoekstra populations and environmental differences among beach mouse Adaptive basis of geographic variation: genetic, phenotypic Supplementary data tml http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/suppl/2009/08/05/rspb.2009.1146.DC1.h "Data Supplement" References http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/276/1674/3809.full.html#ref-list-1 This article cites 49 articles, 18 of which can be accessed free Subject collections (1387 articles) evolution Articles on similar topics can be found in the following collections Email alerting service here right-hand corner of the article or click Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article - sign up in the box at the top http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/subscriptions go to: Proc. R. Soc. B To subscribe to This journal is © 2009 The Royal Society on January 27, 2010 rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org Downloaded from
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Adaptive basis of geographic variation: genetic, phenotypic and environmental differences among beach mouse populations Lynne M. Mullen 1 , Sacha N. Vignieri 1,2, * , Jeffery A. Gore 3 and Hopi E. Hoekstra 1 1 Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 2 Division of Biological Sciences, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA 3 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 3911 Highway 2321, Panama City, FL 32409, USA A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand how and why populations differentiate, both geneti- cally and phenotypically, as they invade a novel habitat. A classical example of adaptation is the pale colour of beach mice, relative to their dark mainland ancestors, which colonized the isolated sandy dunes and barrier islands on Florida’s Gulf Coast. However, much less is known about differentiation among the Gulf Coast beach mice, which comprise five subspecies linearly arrayed on Florida’s shoreline. Here, we test the role of selection in maintaining variation among these beach mouse subspecies at mul- tiple levels—phenotype, genotype and the environments they inhabit. While all beach subspecies have light pelage, they differ significantly in colour pattern. These subspecies are also genetically distinct: pair-wise F ST -values range from 0.23 to 0.63 and levels of gene flow are low. However, we did not find a correlation between phenotypic and genetic distance. Instead, we find a significant association between the average ‘lightness’ of each subspecies and the brightness of the substrate it inhabits: the two most genetically divergent subspecies occupy the most similar habitats and have converged on phenotype, whereas the most genetically similar subspecies occupy the most different environments and have divergent phenotypes. Moreover, allelic variation at the pigmentation gene, Mc1r , is statistically correlated with these colour differences but not with variation at other genetic loci. Together, these results suggest
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2010 for the course ECL 242 taught by Professor Holly during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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Mullens_etal_2009_Ad - Downloaded from rspb..org on Adaptive basis of geographic variation genetic phenotypic and environmental differences among

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