TEST 1 NOTES

TEST 1 NOTES - Air Density o o The more dense the air, the...

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Air Density o The more dense the air, the more lift is generated o Air density is a function of Temp Hotter=less dense air Altitude Higher=dense dense Humidity Density decreases with increase humidity Angle of Attack o Angle between relative air stream and chord of wing o It’s the difference where the wing’s pointing and where the plane’s going AOA vs. Airspeed o Lift and Weight must remain in equilibrium o Less airspeed required greater angle of attack. AOA vs weight o Lift and weight must remain equal o An increase in weight requires an increase in AOA o A decrease in weight requires a decrease in AOA AOA vs air density o Less air density requires greater AOA to maintain lift o Higher altitude-higher AOA o Higher humidity-higher AOA
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o Air density decreases as density altitude increases. High density altitude means low density AOA vs load factor o Load factor= lift/weight o When lift and weight are different the aircraft is changing direction of flight path, therefore acceleration is occurring o The greater the load factor, the greater the AOA AOA vs rate of roll o When aircraft is tolling, the flight path between the right and left wing is different o Therefore, relative wind is coming from a different angle o Since the angle of incidence is fixed, the result is a difference in AOA between wings o Difference is a function of rate of roll Stall o Is a function of AOA Anything that increases AOA brings us closer to a stall. Function of: Weight Load factos Air density Airspeed Rate of roll- differential AOA between wings Stall
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o An airfoil will always stall at the same angle of attack Called critical AOA o Rapid loss of lift o Rapid increase of drag Lift/drag ration o Where there is the most lift for the least amount of drag o This is where the plane will glide the farthest without power o Most efficient AOA for an airfoil shape Controlling the stall o We want it to be progressive rather than sudden o Things that cause the root to stall first Washout- wing twisted leading edge down toward tip Stall strip Slot- fixed in aileron section Propellers o Convert engine torque into thrust o In US, they turn clockwise as viewed by the pilot o Two basic types in use Fixed pitch Blade is not adjustable in flight Simple, cheaper design Not as efficient from take-off to cruise Constant speed
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Blade inalge is adjustable in flight More comples and expensive Optimum efficiency in all speed ranges Problems with props o Left turning tendencies due to Torque effect Left wing must produce more lift than right Corkscrew slip stream Throws air in corkscrew around body of plane Adymmetrical thrust Gyroscopic precession Compensation for left turning due to prop Static stability o Initial response to a disturbance o Positive- tendency to return to trimmed position o Neutral- tendency to stay in new position
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TEST 1 NOTES - Air Density o o The more dense the air, the...

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