CHAPTER I, II, III, References

CHAPTER I, II, III, References - 1 HOW THE ORGANIZATION'S...

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1 HOW THE ORGANIZATION’S CULTURE EFFECTS CUSTOMER SERVICE By Shamseldeen M. Shams A Graduate Research Project Submitted to the Department of Applied Aviation Sciences in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Aeronautical Science
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Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Daytona Beach, Florida February 2010
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3 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION There are many significant problems in the handling of customers on commercial airline flights. Customer service, as it pertains to the manner in which airline customers are treated, varies greatly from one air carrier to another. There is a widely held belief that the culture of the countries from where the aircrews come plays a major role in determining the quality of customer service on commercial flights. Culture is defined as ''the attitudes and behaviors that are characteristic of a particular social group or organization" (Wordnet, 1998, p. 1). Over the years, the demand for customer service has changed and it has led to many new challenges for the major airlines. With the advent of the low cost carriers (LCC), airline passengers are demanding better accommodations but at a lower cost than in the past. Additionally, since aircrews come from many different countries and cultures, and are trained in different philosophies, the way they treat airline passengers differs widely. Background and Significance The aviation industry experienced a large number of accidents in the 1970’s, many of which were attributed to human error. The response to these accidents and the changes made to prevent government intervention resulted in the aviation industry creating standards and training procedures that were aimed at reducing human errors. The way these safety improvements were accomplished was through procedures called double check, check/redundant verification, and cross training (Patient Safety, 2005).
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There are many operations in which mechanics, flight attendants, and other employees are required to review the work they have complete. The Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft mechanics have to perform double checks on the aircraft, and flight attendants have to conduct double checks before takeoff and landing. Ticket/customer service agents have to perform safety checks by doing a double check for overweight luggage or abnormal behaviors. Pilots use checklists and check one another on various pre-flight and in-flight decisions. Cross checking and increases in communication help support a higher level of security. Verification ensures that all safety procedures and policies are part of the activities airline personnel use in pre-flight safety checks. This verification can be carried out by keeping a verification track log that will include the following: (a) problem/procedure that was incorrect or missing, date, time, and (b) the method that was used to correct the issue.
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2010 for the course ASCI 605 taught by Professor Donaldf.logsdonjr.,ph.d. during the Spring '10 term at Embry-Riddle FL/AZ.

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CHAPTER I, II, III, References - 1 HOW THE ORGANIZATION'S...

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