9291_c016 - 16 Power System Dynamic Interaction with...

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Unformatted text preview: 16 Power System Dynamic Interaction with Turbine Generators Richard G. Farmer Arizona State University Bajarang L. Agrawal Arizona Public Service Company Donald G. Ramey Consultant 16.1 Introduction..................................................................... 16-1 16.2 Subsynchronous Resonance............................................ 16-2 Known SSR Events . SSR Terms and Definitions . SSR Physical Principles . SSR Mitigation . SSR Analysis . SSR Countermeasures . Fatigue Damage and Monitoring . SSR Testing . Summar y 16.3 Device-Dependent Subsynchronous Oscillations....... 16-16 HVDC Converter Controls . Variable Speed Motor Controllers . Power System Stabilizers . Other 16.4 Supersynchronous Resonance ...................................... 16-18 Known SPSR Events . SPSR Physical Principles . SPSR Countermeasures 16.5 Device-Dependent Supersynchronous Oscillations.... 16-19 Known DDSPSO Events . DDSPSO Physical Principles . DDSPSO Countermeasure 16.6 Transient Shaft Torque Oscillations............................. 16-20 16.1 Introduction Turbine-generators for power production are critical parts of electric power systems, which provide power and energy to the user. The power system can range from a single generator and load to a complex system. A complex system may contain hundreds of power lines at various voltage levels and hundreds of transformers, turbine-generators, and loads. When the power system and its components are in the normal state, the synchronous generators produce sinusoidal voltages at synchronous frequency (60 Hz in the U.S.) and desired magnitude. The voltages cause currents to flow at synchronous frequency through the power system to the loads. The only current flowing in the generator rotor is the direct current in the generator field. Mechanical torque on the turbine-generator rotor produced by the turbine is constant and unidirectional. There is a reaction torque produced by the magnetic field in the generator, which balances the mechanical torque and maintains constant speed. The system is said to be in synchronism and there is no dynamic interaction between the power system and the turbine-generators. At other times, the system and its components are disturbed, thereby causing a periodic exchange of energy between the components of the power system. If there is a periodic exchange of energy between a turbine-generator and the power system, we will refer to this energy exchange as power system ß 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. dynamic interaction with a turbine-generator. When this occurs the magnetic interaction in the generator together with motion of the generator rotor results in oscillating torques on the shafts of the turbine-generator. If the frequency of these torques is equal to, or near, one of the natural mechanical frequencies of the turbine-generator, excessive mechanical stress may occur along the turbine-generator rotor at critical locations. In addition, excessive voltage and current may occur in the generator and power system.at critical locations....
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2010 for the course POWER 332 taught by Professor Dr during the Spring '10 term at Ain Shams University.

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9291_c016 - 16 Power System Dynamic Interaction with...

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