5715ch8 - 8 Permanent-MagnetAssisted Reluctance Synchronous...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 8 -1 8 Permanent-Magnet- Assisted Reluctance Synchronous Starter/ Alternators for Electric Hybrid Vehicles 8.1 Introduction . ...................................................................... 8 -1 8.2 Topologies of PM-RSM . .................................................... 8 -3 8.3 Finite Element Analysis. ..................................................... 8 -5 Flux Distribution The d q Inductances The Cogging Torque Core Losses Computation by FEM 8.4 The d q Model of PM-RSM . ......................................... 8 -12 8.5 Steady-State Operation at No Load and Symmetric Short-Circuit. ................................................................... 8 -19 Generator No-Load Symmetrical Short-Circuit 8.6 Design Aspects for Wide Speed Range Constant Power Operation . ............................................................ 8 -21 8.7 Power Electronics for PM-RSM for Automotive Applications. .................................................................... 8 -27 8.8 Control of PM-RSM for EHV. ....................................... 8 -30 8.9 State Observers without Signal Injection for Motion Sensorless Control. .......................................................... 8 -32 8.10 Signal Injection Rotor Position Observers. ................... 8 -34 8.11 Initial and Low Speed Rotor Position Tracking. ........... 8 -34 8.12 Summary. ......................................................................... 8 -39 References. .................................................................................. 8 -41 8.1 Introduction The permanent-magnet-assisted reluctance synchronous machine (PM-RSM), also called the interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous machine, with high magnetic saliency was proven to be compet- automobile applications where a large constant power speed range w max / w b > 3 to 4 is required. The cost comparisons show the PM-RSM starter alternator system, including power electronics control, to be notably less expensive than the surface PM synchronous machine or switched reluctance machine system at the same output. It is comparable with the cost of the induction machine system. In terms of itive, price-wise ( Figure 8.1 ) [1], and superior in terms of total losses ( Figure 8.2 ) [2] for starter/alternator
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
© 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 8 -2 Variable Speed Generators total machine plus power electronics losses, the PM-RSM is slightly superior even to the surface PM synchronous machine (Figure 8.2), and notably superior to the induction machine system, all designed for the same machine volume, at 30 kW [2]. It was also demonstrated that PM-RSM [2] is capable of a notably larger constant power speed range than the surface PM synchronous, or the induction, or the switched reluctance machine of the same volume. In essence, both the lower cost and the wide constant power speed range are explained by the combined action of PMs and the high magnetic saliency torque to reduce the peak current for peak torque at low speed and reduce flux/torque at high speeds. Starter/alternators for automobile applications are forced to operate at a constant power speed range w max / w b > 3 to 4 and up to 12 to 1. The higher the interval (without notably oversizing the machine or the converter) constant power speed range, the better. This is how the PM-RSM becomes a tough competitor for electric hybrid vehicles (EHVs). The larger w max / w b is, the smaller the PM contribution to torque. In what follows, we will treat the main topological aspects, field distribution, and parameters by finite element method (FEM), lumped parameter modeling of saturated PM-RSM, core loss models, design issues for wide w max / w b ratios, and system models for dynamics and vector flux-oriented control (FOC) and direct torque and flux control (DTFC) with and without position control feedback.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 42

5715ch8 - 8 Permanent-MagnetAssisted Reluctance Synchronous...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online