5715ch10 - 10 Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator...

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© 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 10 -1 10 Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator Systems 10.1 Introduction . .................................................................. 10 -2 10.2 Practical Configurations and Their Characterization. ............................................................ 10 -3 Distributed vs. Concentrated Windings 10.3 Airgap Field Distribution, emf and Torque . .............. 10 -11 10.4 Stator Core Loss Modeling. ......................................... 10 -19 FEM-Derived Core Loss Formulas Simplified Analytical Core Loss Formulas 10.5 The Circuit Model ........................................................ 10 -26 The Phase Coordinate Model The d q Model of PMSG 10.6 Circuit Model of PMSG with Shunt Capacitors and AC Load. ................................................................ 10 -33 10.7 Circuit Model of PMSG with Diode Rectifier Load . .............................................................. 10 -35 10.8 Utilization of Third Harmonic for PMSG with Diode Rectifiers . .................................................. 10 -38 10.9 Autonomous PMSGs with Controlled Constant Speed and AC Load. .................................... 10 -41 10.10 Grid-Connected Variable-Speed PMSG System . ....... 10 -45 The Diode Rectifier and Boost DC–DC Converter Case 10.11 The PM Genset with Multiple Outputs . .................... 10 -48 10.12 Super-High-Speed PM Generators: Design Issues . ... 10 -52 Rotor Sizing Stator Sizing The Losses 10.13 Super-High-Speed PM Generators: Power Electronics Control Issues . .......................................... 10 -58 10.14 Design of a 42 V dc Battery-Controlled-Output PMSG System . .............................................................. 10 -62 Design Initial Data The Minimum Speed: n min The Number of Poles: 2 p 1 • T he Rotor Configuration The Stator Winding Type Winding Tapping The PMSG Current Waveform The Diode Rectifier Imposes almost Unity Power Factor Peak Torque-Based Sizing Generator to DC Voltage Relationships The Ψ PM , L s R s Expressions 10.15 Methods for Testing PMSGs . ...................................... 10 -71 Standstill Tests No-Load Generator Tests Short-Circuit Generator Tests Stator Leakage Inductance and Skin Effect The Motor No-Load Test The Generator Load Tests
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© 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 10 -2 Variable Speed Generators 10.16 Note on Medium-Power Vehicular Electric Generator Systems. ....................................................... 10 -81 10.17 Summary. ...................................................................... 10 -82 References. ................................................................................. 10 -84 10.1 Introduction By permanent magnet (PM) synchronous generators (SGs), we mean here radial or axial airgap PM brushless generators with distributed ( q > 1) or concentrated ( q 1) windings and rectangular or sinusoidal current control with surface PM or interior PM (IPM) rotors. Multiple pole transverse flux machines (TFMs) or flux A PMSG’s output voltage amplitude and frequency are proportional to speed. In constant speed prime- mover applications, PMSGs might perform voltage self-regulation by proper design; that is, inset or interior PM pole rotors. Small speed variation ( ± 10 to 15%) may be acceptable for diode rectified loads with series capacitors and voltage self-regulation. However, most applications require operation at vari- able speed, and, in this case, constant output voltage vs. load, be it direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), requires full static power conversion and close-loop control. Versatile mobile generator sets (gensets) use variable speed for fuel savings, and PMSGs with full power electronics control can provide high torque density, low losses, and multiple outputs (DC and AC at 50 [60] Hz or 400 Hz, single phase or three phase).
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2010 for the course POWER 332 taught by Professor Dr during the Spring '10 term at Ain Shams University.

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5715ch10 - 10 Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator...

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