The loss of the Columbia Space shuttle and some of its predecessors such as the famous Challenger

The loss of the Columbia Space shuttle and some of its predecessors such as the famous Challenger

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The loss of the Columbia Space shuttle and some of its predecessors such as the famous Challenger disaster, have one reoccurring and key ethical problem pressure. As in many industries engineers are faced with pressure from business side of the company, which can often put in jeopardy the safety of the public and employees. These schedule and budgetary pressures led to the managerial decision to launch Challenger which had devastating results. These problems re-emerged in the events before the disintegration of the Columbia Shuttle. After the challenger disaster the shuttle program suffered major budgetary cuts and work force reduction which meant more pressure on the staff to deliver the same results. In addition the so called schedules for launching reappeared with pressure to meet these deadlines. Although it was not a major factor for accident, it compounded to become a part larger problem. After the launch of the shuttle, regular revision of the launch tape revealed foam strike. This was forwarded to the Shuttle program management which attempted to obtain higher resolution imagery from department of defense. Engineers, following NASA procedure, formed a Debris Assessment Team. Boeing engineers on the Team arranged for their Houston operation to run a model called "Crater" designed to predict depth of penetration through tiles or RCC by falling foam or ice pieces. This was the first application of Crater since its move to Houston from Boeing's Huntington Beach, California, operation. The model was designed for popcorn-sized cylindrical- shaped pieces and had never been used on something so large as the Columbia foam piece. It was
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2010 for the course MIME 221 taught by Professor Hassani during the Spring '10 term at MO Southern.

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The loss of the Columbia Space shuttle and some of its predecessors such as the famous Challenger

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