the most important changes to working-class family life in the nineteenth-century.

The most important changes to working-class family life in the nineteenth-century.

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(LAB-263704-01-08FA1) United States Labor History I was unsure if the focus of this assignment had to do with the working- class family life in terms of family structure, traditions, and culture and the changes that were brought upon it by the nineteenth century, or the type of work that working- family‟s did because of the changes of the nineteenth century. Both are important, but I will write briefly about the former and more about the latter. I believe both are important and intertwined. In the course of reading for this assignment, I researched the changes that were brought on by industrialization in the nineteenth century. In terms of the family unit, I‟m sure this must have drastically changed life for all Americans. I can picture life in the antebellum in the North as more relaxed. Small farms, bustling seaside towns with import/export companies, and small textile companies were prevalent. A skilled worker had the opportunity to see his product from beginning to end with pride. In the post-bellum we can see a skilled worker, whose skills were no longer necessary. He was now used for his labor and not his skill. We can tell this by the increase in hours, and decrease in preparation needed. To try and explain my point, I tried to take the impacts of the nineteenth century and the industrial revolution, from a perspective of a skilled worker and his family. Shoemakers were a skilled group of workers who took pride in their work. Shoes were made by hand, and with pride. The following excerpt from a
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Shoemakers‟ Shop described by David Johnson depicts a skill that took years to learn and that could be done with pride. This ends with the mechanization of their specific industry. This skill is lost and in turn broken into tasks done by less skilled workers. “Traditional craft production centered around an independent master artisan, his journeymen, and the apprentice helpers who worked together in small shops. Apprentices worked alongside masters and received training in the “mysteries of the craft” in exchange for their labor. Journeymen looked forward to becoming proprietors when they accumulated sufficient capital and skill. In his Sketches of Lynn (1880), David Johnson recalled the masculine work culture
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The most important changes to working-class family life in the nineteenth-century.

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