Kilmer-PhilosophyOfAI

Kilmer-PhilosophyOfAI - Philosophy of Consciousness And...

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Philosophy of Consciousness And Ethics In Artificial Intelligence By Shawn Kilmer University Of Oregon December 2007 Front Cover: Which of the two beings depicted on the front cover should be granted more rights than the other? What of the CPU circuit depicted? If it is capable of simulating all the same behaviors of an animal or even a human, should it also be granted rights? The picture of the man is actually a computer generated 3D model from the NVIDIA Corporation, while the cow is indeed a photo of a real cow. This is just to show how we can be fooled in what gives us the impression of possessing intelligence.
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Shawn Kilmer | December 2007 - 1 - Since the creation of the first 'smart' computation machines in the time of Alan Turing, the father of computation and artificial intelligence, questions have risen over what makes a machine intelligent. Debates have sprung up over the decades on many questions regarding the differences in the consciousness of humans and the possible consciousness of machines – both in current machines and yet-to-be-invented ones. Some of the questions raised are: what is the minimum definition of what we would consider consciousness in any entity, machine or biological? If we do at some time consider a machine intelligent or as having a conscience, are there any ethical implications raised with how these machines are used? If machines can meet the Turing Test or meet a definition of consciousness that we could come up with, should they be granted some of the rights that other living entities have? Will we need to modify our laws about human and animal rights if machines can meet these requirements? MINIMUM DEFINITION OF CONSCIOUSNESS In starting to think about and address the question of the minimum definition of what we would consider consciousness, we first need to come to some understanding about what we mean Alan Turing 2 by the term consciousness. Let’s first get the opinion of Turing himself: "I do not wish to give the impression that I think there is no mystery about consciousness. .. But I do not think these mysteries necessarily need to be solved before we can answer the question with which we are concerned in this paper" (Alan Turing, quoted from Russel, 953). I quite agree with this stance on the present question, and that is that no one currently asserts that they have a perfect understanding of consciousness. Given that, we need to decide what consciousness will mean for us in a given application. I take my definition of consciousness herein to follow along the lines of a quite common response to the famous Chinese Room Problem proposed by John Searle. In summary, Shawn Kilmer | December 2007 - 1 -
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Shawn Kilmer | December 2007 - 2 - Searle argues against “Strong AI,” which is the theory that machines can have a conscience and be intelligent. To illustrate his point, he describes a room in which a non-Chinese-speaking man receives input through a slot in the form of written Chinese characters. He has a rule book written in the
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Kilmer-PhilosophyOfAI - Philosophy of Consciousness And...

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