Foolish Insults and Insulting Fools

Foolish Insults and - Foolish Insults and Insulting Fools Hamlet considered quite insane by both characters in the book Hamlet and readers of the

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Foolish Insults and Insulting Fools Hamlet, considered quite insane by both characters in the book Hamlet and readers of the play, pulls off many feigned acts of madness and remains, in fact, in complete control of his psyche. Those he does not admire, he manages to insult directly without their knowledge. Shakespeare presents one example—in Act two, Scene 2—after Claudius and Polonius have decided to spy on Hamlet and Ophelia from behind the tapestry. In the dialogue that ensues with Hamlet and Polonius, Hamlet manages to offend Polonius in many caustic ways without Polonius’s knowledge. Using metaphors and symbolism in addition to his feigned madness as a cover, Hamlet successfully makes a fool of Polonius. Hamlet directs the first of a series of bitter jests at Polonius by calling him a “fishmonger” in response to Polonius’s question, "Do you know me, my lord?" The insult results from Hamlet’s intuition that Polonius made Ophelia break off her relationship with Hamlet by...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2010 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Temlah during the Spring '10 term at University of Jordan.

Page1 / 2

Foolish Insults and - Foolish Insults and Insulting Fools Hamlet considered quite insane by both characters in the book Hamlet and readers of the

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online