Raymond Martin

Raymond Martin - a result of being so deeply...

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Connor Scribner Philosophy 2300 Raymond Martin Raymond Martin’s, , does a fantastic job of analyzing The Problem of the Meaning of Life vs The Problems of Life . To best summarize Martin’s viewpoint, he explains that he has distinguished three different issues that challenge the meaning of our lives: bad times, death, and philosophical doubts. Martin compares the works of fellow philosophers Richard Taylor and Thomas Nagel throughout the text in order to reach his verdict. Ultimately, Martin concludes that the problem of the meaning of life is that as humans, we are in a constant struggle to satisfy ourselves; “whatever you think is going to satisfy you completely, it is not going to satisfy you completely for long” (Martin, 5). Martin proceeds to explain that the only possible way to win the inner conflict for satisfaction is to be so deeply satisfied and content that you feel that you could die right then and it wouldn’t matter. He states that as
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Unformatted text preview: a result of being so deeply satisfied/content, death holds no terror over you because you know that you will die satisfied with the life you lived. Most often this is not the case, according to Martin satisfaction is only temporary. Thus, the battle rages on. In retrospect, Martin argues a valid view, which does a good job of mediating the two extreme views of Taylor and Nagel. I feel that the biggest strength that results from this argument is the manner in which Martin presented his view. He made the audience feel as if they could become satisfied and find a true meaning to their life (unlike Nagel), but at the same time did a good job of explaining that their human instincts to desire more would most always be their foe. On the other hand, Martin only confirms that humans live Sisyphisian existences by explaining that an individual can never be completely satisfied....
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This note was uploaded on 03/05/2010 for the course PHIL 2300 taught by Professor Scala during the Spring '08 term at Texas Tech.

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