Lec-40-Chap-12-2

Lec-40-Chap-12-2 - Lecture 40 Organic Polymers Moore et al Chapter 12.8 Note Don't forget to print out the exam review and activity on Organic

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Lecture 40: Organic Polymers M oore et al Chapter 12.8 Note: • Don’t forget to print out the exam review and activity on Organic Reactions from the schedule on the main web site. • Be sure to work through both of these before your next recitation. • You may want to schedule 2½ hours of uninterrupted time to work through the practice final, then grade yourself using the key that will be posted sometime Monday. Learning Objectives • Know the relationship between polymers and monomers • Know the steps in addition polymerization • Know the steps in condensation polymerization • Given a polymer, identify the monomers from which it is made and the process by which it is made • Given one or more monomers, identify the polymer they will make and the polymerization process they will undergo • Understand the effects of chain length, branching, cross-linking, side chains, copolymerization, and bonding on polymer properties
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Vocabulary Polymer Monomer Addition polymer Initiation step Propagation step Chain termination step Average molar mass Degree of polymerization Elastomer Chain length Branching Cross linking Copolymer Condensation polymer Macromolecules During the early 20 th century, most chemists conceived of molecules as being made up of relatively few atoms. The properties of some materials such as rubber and cellulose (fiber from plants) were not readily explained by this conception, however. In the 1920’s, Staudinger proposed the existence of very long chain molecules that were held together by normal covalent bonds. Such molecules could have very large molar masses in the thousands to millions of grams per mole. The impact of this notion on chemists is suggested by the following quote: “We are shocked like zoologists would be if they were told somewhere in Africa an elephant was found who was 1500 feet long and 300 feet high.“ Over the next decade, sufficient advances had been made in the synthesis and characterization of macromolecules that they became widely accepted.
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Polymers are macromolecules composed of repeating units termed monomers that are typically arranged in a chain-like structure. For example, polyethylene is made from ethylene: n H 2 C=CH 2 where: n is a variable number of units in the chain * indicates continuation of the chain [ ] or ( ) identifies the monomer Polyethylene is a polymer of ethylene.
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This note was uploaded on 03/06/2010 for the course CHE 131 taught by Professor Kerber during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lec-40-Chap-12-2 - Lecture 40 Organic Polymers Moore et al Chapter 12.8 Note Don't forget to print out the exam review and activity on Organic

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