{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

chapter 4 summary - Chapter IV Summary Federalism Theories...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter IV Summary Federalism Theories and Metaphors Federalism: is the division of power between central government and regional governments. Two or more governments exercise power and authority over the same people and the same territory. Sovereignty: the quality of being supreme in power or authority. Dual Federalism It is a view that holds that Constitution is a compact among sovereign states, so that the powers of the national government and the states are clearly different. Under dual federalism, the functions and responsibilities of the national and state governments are theoretically different and practically separate each other. States rights: is the idea that all rights not specifically conferred on the national government by the US Constitution reserved to the states. The supporters of states’ rights insist that the activities of Congress should be confined to the enumerated powers. Implied powers : are those powers that Congress needs to execute its enumerated powers. Dual federalism is like two layered cake. Cooperative Federalism It is a view that holds that constitution is an agreement among people who are citizens of both state and nation, so there is much overlap between state powers and national powers. The national and state governments work as intermingled in vertical and horizontal strands. The cake example reveals how scholars believe the dual federalism should be, but as in examples it is different. Elastic Clause: is the last clause in the section 8 Article I of the constitution, which gives congress the means to execute its powers. Cooperative federalism postulates suppleness in the elastic clause and confines the Tenth Amendment to a self-evident, obvious truth. Federalism’s Dynamic s American federalism is a flexible and dynamic system. Due the flexibility, both elected and appointed politicians across levels of government often make policy decisions without regard to theories of what American Federalism should look like. There is growing recognition that public problems cut across government.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern