Chapter 11 summary

Chapter 11 summary - Political Science Chapter XI Summary...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Political Science Chapter XI Summary Congress Structure and Powers of Congress Congress has two separate chambers. Representation in the House is based on population. Each state has two senators. The Constitution gives the House and Senate essentially similar legislative tasks, though each has powers that are only its own. The House initiates impeachment proceedings against a President or federal judges. Bills with revenue must originate in the House. The Senate impeachment trial votes to convict the President or federal judges and remove them from office. The Senate must approve major presidential appointments. The Senate has the sole power to affirm treaties. Electing Congress Incumbents have a very high rate of return to Congress. Incumbents remain protected by district lines that are gerrymandered to protect incumbents or the dominant party during the process of district reapportionment every ten years after the federal census is conducted. Name recognition , largely through media exposure, contributes to voters’ familiarity with the incumbent. Casework
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/06/2010 for the course POL 102 taught by Professor Cover during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Page1 / 2

Chapter 11 summary - Political Science Chapter XI Summary...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online