Lecture 6 - Topics for the day Administrative stuff Quantum...

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Topics for the day Administrative stuff Quantum mechanics One dimensional particle in a box The hydrogen atom Quantum numbers Electronic orbitals Administrative stuff Wednesday is Twelfth class day. By then you must have: Add/dropped the class Filled in the exam makeup form if you need any makeups Finished the initial ALEKS assessment Provided letters for accommodations, religious holidays. .. So far, 29 of you have started HW One on Quest (due Fri) and 19 have started the Coursework ALEKS (due Fri week) Sample Exam One will be posted on Quest later today. What’s on the exam? Revision of prerequisite knowledge Textbook chapters 1–4 ALEKS preparatory chemistry assessment Quest homework Quantum mechanics and the atom Textbook chapter 12 ALEKS course homework, objective 1 Quest homework Lecture clicker questions and worked problems 1 2 3
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E =0 Emission E = 0, and as n becomes smaller, E is lower, thus all the energy levels must be negative. Δ E = E 1 – E 2 = h ν Δ E = h ν = E 2 – E 1 When an electron makes a transition from a lower n to a higher n level, the difference in energy comes from a photon: Absorption In the case of absorption, we also say that the photon has excited the electron. When an electron makes a transition from a higher n to a lower n level, the difference in energy is lost as a photon: Emission Absorption Where were we? A. n=4 n=2 B. n=4 n=1 C. n=3 n=1 D. n=4 n=3 E. n=2 n=1 iClicker Time An electron in a H atom could undergo any of these transitions by emitting light. Which transition would give light of the shortest wavelength? Does this energy level diagram help? Δ E = h ν = λ hc Shortest λ Largest E The Heisenberg uncertainty principles shows us that there is a fundamental limit to how well we can “know” certain properties. We saw from a calculation that the size of the uncertainty in electron position is similar to the size of an atom. So we don’t know for sure exactly where those electrons are! If we can’t say where exactly an electron is, it seems unlikely that it will be in a well-deFned circular orbit around the nucleus. We will start talking about probability distributions to describe the location of an election, meaning identifying areas where the probability is high that the electron may be there. 4
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This note was uploaded on 03/06/2010 for the course CHEM 52375 taught by Professor Shear during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas-Tyler.

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Lecture 6 - Topics for the day Administrative stuff Quantum...

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