7 SANES CH. 7.2 only 2009

7 SANES CH 7.2 - Chapter 7 Sanes Reh and Harris Cell Survival and the Death Gene Part 2 Conferences on cell death are annual events This is the

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Chapter 7 Sanes, Reh, and Harris Cell Survival and the Death Gene Part 2 Conferences on cell death are annual events This is the logo for the Fourth European Workshop on Cell Death in Istanbul in 2004, building on the work of this man: H. Robert Horvitz nobel prize 2002 for genetic control of PCD
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2008 Nobel prize in chemistry went to 3 scientists who were instrumental in developing green fluorescent protein into an important biological tool. Roger Tsien Osamu Shimomura Martin Chalfie Science, 1993, Nobel Prize, 2008 UCSD COLUMBIA BU
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The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is composed of 238 amino acids (26.9 kDa), originally isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light.[1][2] The GFP from A. victoria has a major excitation peak at a wavelength of 395 nm and a minor one at 475 nm. Its emission peak is at 509 nm which is in the lower green portion of the visible spectrum. The GFP from the sea pansy (Renilla reniformis) has a single major excitation peak at 498 nm. In cell and molecular biology, the GFP gene is frequently used as a reporter of expression.[3] In modified forms it has been used to make biosensors, and many animals have been created that express GFP as a proof-of-concept that a gene can be expressed throughout a given organism. The GFP gene can be introduced into organisms and maintained in their genome through breeding, or local injection with a viral vector which can be used to introduce the gene. To date, many bacteria, yeast and other fungal cells, plant, fly, and mammalian cells, including human, have been created using GFP as a marker. Martin Chalfie, Osamu Shimomura and Roger Y. Tsien share the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein. (from Wikipedia) GFP fluorescence: 395 nm wavelength (blue) in And 509 nm wavelength (green) out green fluorescent mice developed for all sorts of studies green fluorescent monkey developed for studies of Huntington's Disease
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We see radiation as color if it occurs at wavelengths between roughly below 400 and above 700 nm due to the sensitivities of our photopigments GFP activating wavelength 395 nm GFP emitted wavelength 509 nm
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The neurotrophin family of growth factors and their Trk receptors Tropomyosin Related Tyrosine Kinase A, B, and C Proform (proNGG is 250 a.a. peptide cleaved post-translationally to 120 a.a. active NGF Homodimer Is active form Only 50% sequence homology proNGF is the high affinity ligand for the p75 receptor Lost in p75 KO Cell survival role Cell death role
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becomes attached and Phosphorylated to initiate a cascade of Intracellular events 2 proform molecules need to be cleaved so that individual NGF molecules Can be assembled into dimers. Binding step between
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This note was uploaded on 03/06/2010 for the course NSC 269 taught by Professor Ebner during the Spring '10 term at Vanderbilt.

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7 SANES CH 7.2 - Chapter 7 Sanes Reh and Harris Cell Survival and the Death Gene Part 2 Conferences on cell death are annual events This is the

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