lecture_9_29_second_parsimony

lecture_9_29_second_parsimony - A rooted tree Ingroup A B C...

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A rooted tree A Outgroup C B Ingroup Root Now, think about it a different way, where you remove the root , and unfold the branch leading to the outgroup . That gives you what is called an unrooted tree.
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An unrooted tree A Outgroup C B Ingroup Often, when we make phylogenies from data, we actually first make an unrooted tree . Sometimes we know what the outgroup is, and sometimes we don’t (in this case, we do). Then, we later root the tree along the branch between the ingroup and the outgroup.
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data matrix to a phylogeny, we will use the Principle of Parsimony, which states that, all other things being equal, we tend to accept as correct the hypothesis that best explains the data with the fewest added assumptions. Here, we minimize the number of evolutionary transitions, or steps that occur. A step on a tree is the replacement of one character state by another in a species. Then, we evaluate the number of steps required on each possible tree for
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lecture_9_29_second_parsimony - A rooted tree Ingroup A B C...

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