Understanding Writing Assig..

Understanding Writing Assig.. - Understanding Writing...

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This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/). When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice at bottom. Understanding Writing Assignments This resource was written by Mia Martini . Last full revision by Allen Brizee . Last edited by Allen Brizee on January 26th 2008 at 11:51AM Summary: This resource describes some steps you can take to better understand the requirements of your writing assignments. This resource works for either in-class, teacher-led discussion or for personal use. 1. Understanding Writing Assignments How to Decipher the Paper Assignment Many instructors write their assignment prompts differently. By following a few steps, you can better understand the requirements for the assignment. The best way, as always, is to ask the instructor about anything confusing. Read the prompt the entire way through once. This gives you an overall view of what is going on. 1. Underline or circle the portions that you absolutely must know. This information may include due date, research (source) requirements, page length, and format (MLA, APA, CMS). 2. Underline or circle important phrases. You should know your instructor at least a little by now - what phrases does she use in class? Does he repeatedly say a specific word? If these are in the prompt, you know the instructor wants you to use them in the assignment. 3. Think about how you will address the prompt. The prompt contains clues on how to write the assignment. Your instructor will often describe the ideas she wants discussed either in questions, in bullet points, or in the text of the prompt. Think about each of these sentences and number them so that you can write a paragraph or section of your essay on that portion if necessary. 4. Rank ideas in descending order, from most important to least important. Instructors may include more questions or talking points than you can cover in your assignment, so rank them in the order you think is more important. One area of the prompt may be more interesting to you than another. 5.
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2010 for the course CHEM 12A taught by Professor Alston during the Spring '10 term at Saddleback.

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Understanding Writing Assig.. - Understanding Writing...

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