Chapter_34 - Chapter34Chapter34

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 34Chapter 34 The Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand WHAT’S NEW IN THE THIRD EDITION: The  Case Study  on "Why the Fed Watches the Stock Market (and Vice Versa)" has been updated. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this chapter, students should understand: the theory of liquidity preference as a short-run theory of the interest rate. how monetary policy affects interest rates and aggregate demand. how fiscal policy affects interest rates and aggregate demand. the debate over whether policymakers should try to stabilize the economy. CONTEXT AND PURPOSE: Chapter 21 is the second chapter in a three-chapter sequence that concentrates on short-run fluctuations  in the economy around its long-term trend. In Chapter 20, the model of aggregate supply and aggregate  demand is introduced.  In Chapter 21, we see how the government’s monetary and fiscal policies affect  aggregate demand. In Chapter 22, we will see some of the tradeoffs between short-run and long-run  objectives when we address the relationship between inflation and unemployment. The purpose of Chapter 21 is to address the short-run effects of monetary and fiscal policies. In  Chapter 20, we found that when aggregate demand or short-run aggregate supply shifts, it causes  fluctuations in output. As a result, policymakers sometimes try to offset these shifts by shifting aggregate  demand with monetary and fiscal policy. Chapter 21 addresses the theory behind these policies and  some of the shortcomings of stabilization policy. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 Chapter 34/The Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand
Background image of page 2
Chapter 34/The Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand   3 KEY POINTS: 1. In developing a theory of short-run economic fluctuations, Keynes proposed the theory of liquidity  preference to explain the determinants of the interest rate.  According to this theory, the interest rate  adjusts to balance the supply and demand for money. 2. An increase in the price level raises money demand and increases the interest rate that brings the  money market into equilibrium.  Because the interest rate represents the cost of borrowing, a higher  interest rate reduces investment and, thereby, the quantity of goods and services demanded.  The  downward-sloping aggregate-demand curve expresses this negative relationship between the price  level and the quantity demanded.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/07/2010 for the course FMT 0438310384 taught by Professor Hung during the Spring '10 term at Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus.

Page1 / 29

Chapter_34 - Chapter34Chapter34

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online