Physics, Lab 9 - Physics Lab 9 Work-Energy Joshua Budhu Lab...

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Physics Lab 9 Work-Energy Joshua Budhu Lab Partner: Raymond Zhao Date Performed: 11/13/08 Date Due: 11/20/08
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Objective: The purpose of the Work-Energy experiment is to investigate the validity of the work- energy relationship Description: A horizontal string is attached to a glider on a horizontal air track. The string goes over a smart pulley and has a mass on the end. The glider is let go and the velocity of the glider is measured as a function of distance. The velocity of the glider is measured at two points and the change of KE calculated for each mass (glider and hanging mass) for both together. The work done on each mass and for the system is calculated. Theory: Consider a point mass m acted upon by a net force F=F(r). The position, velocity, and acceleration of the mass are given by r, v, a and the time by t. The force F may be a function of r. Newton’s 2 nd Law for the mass is F=ma. This is integrated over position from an initial position (i) to a position (f). (integral from i f = m integral from I f a * dr.) The left hand side is defined as the work W done on m as it moves from ri to rf. It is the only the component of the force parallel or anti-parallel to the motion of m that contributes to the work. The right hand side can be transformed to: (1/2)mvf^2- (1/2)mvi^2. The quantity 1/2 mv^2 is defined as the KE. In words, when m moves from ri to rf, the net work W done on m between those two points is equal to the change in KE between those two points. W=∆KE. This is the most basic form of the work-energy theorem. TO be used correctly, W must include all the work done by all the forces between the two points under consideration. The work-energy theorem can be applied to a system of particles. The total work done is equal to the total change in KE. Care must be taken with the work done by the forces between the particles of the system, or the “internal” work. The internal work may not cancel out. The motion in this experiment is one dimensional and the vector notation used in defining work is not needed. If the one dimension is taken to be x, the work become the integral between I and f Fdx. This is equal to the area under the F vs. x curve for the portion of the curve between the vertical
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two vertical lines defined by xi and xf. The statistics of SWS will calculate this area for you. Procedure:
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2010 for the course PHYSICS V.Physics taught by Professor Hoggbudickadler during the Spring '10 term at NYU.

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Physics, Lab 9 - Physics Lab 9 Work-Energy Joshua Budhu Lab...

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