Exp11Report - Inquiry into Calorimetry and Heats of...

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Unformatted text preview: Inquiry into Calorimetry and Heats of Reaction Omar Uribe I commit to uphold the ideals of honor and integrity by refusing to betray the trust bestowed upon me as a member of the Georgia Tech community. 11/17/2008 Chem 1310 A2 Abstract : This experiment explored the basic concepts and principles of calorimetry and heats of reaction. The experiment required the construction of a simple calorimeter and the determination of its heat capacity. The calorimeter was made and calibrated so it may yield accurate results when measuring the heat of the reactions that took place in it. Four different types of reactions were used in this experiment (precipitation, acid/base, dissolution of salt, and redox) and the enthalpy was measured for each one. The experimentally calculated enthalpies showed the reactions to be exothermic, because the final temperature was greater than the initial one meaning that heat was released, with the exception of the salt dissolution reaction whose final temperature was lower than the initial temperature, meaning it absorbed heat form its surroundings. The experiment designed a way to measure the enthalpies of reactions while taking into account the heat absorbed by the calorimeter itself. Introduction: The objective of the experiment was to experimentally measure the enthalpies of several types of reactions by using a calorimeter. Enthalpy is a state function, defined as H = E + PV, where E is the internal energy of the system, P is the pressure of the system, and V is the volume of the system, but for reactions carried out at a constant pressure, the change in enthalpy equals q rxn or the heat of the reaction. Since all of these reactions were executed at a constant pressure, the heat of the reaction was measured and the enthalpy could be more easily determined from these measurements. To measure the heat of reactions, a calorimeter was made but because the calorimeter itself will absorb heat its heat capacity had to be calculated and taken into account during enthalpy calculations. Experimental Details: I. Construction and Calibration of Calorimeter A calorimeter is a device used to measure heat release or absorption in chemical reactions. A simple calorimeter was made from nesting two Styrofoam cups, covering the top of them with a lid and placing a thermometer through the lid. When making the calorimeter, it is important to try and keep the hole through which the thermometer passes as small as possible to reduce the amount of heat that escapes through it. For the same reason, this calorimeter requires two cups since the second cup provides insulation and greatly reduces the heat loss through the walls of the cup. When dealing with heat loss it is important to remember that the calorimeter itself will absorb heat from the reaction. The heat capacity of the calorimeter was determined prior to measuring any reactions so it could be taken into account when calculating the change in temperature of the reactions. To calculate the heat capacity of the calorimeter 50.0 mL of tap temperature of the reactions....
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY 1310 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '10 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Exp11Report - Inquiry into Calorimetry and Heats of...

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