Lab Report - Experiment 4 Quantum Mechanics Windows to Atomic Structure Arghaya Dalapati Lab Partner Nate Young Section I2 TA Arren Washington

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Experiment 4: Quantum Mechanics – Windows to Atomic Structure Arghaya Dalapati September 24, 2009 Lab Partner: Nate Young Section: I2 TA: Arren Washington GEORGIA TECH HONOR CHALLENGE STATEMENT I commit to uphold the ideals of honor and integrity by refusing to betray the trust bestowed upon me as a member of the Georgia Tech community. Arghaya Dalapati
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Abstract: For part A of the lab spectroscopes were to see the diffracted wavelengths of the light emitted by the light source. The spectroscopes were used on continuous white-light emissions, mercury line emissions, and H-atom line emissions. In the mercury line emission spectra only two colors were seen, green and violet, with wavelengths of 537 nm and 425 nm respectively. The wavelengths recorded from white light emissions ranged from 400 nm to 640. For H-atom emission the average wavelength for red was 654 nm, for blue-green was 478nm, and for violet-blue was 440 nm. For the last part of this experiment we used spectroscopes to observe colors and wavelengths from the combustion of ions. From this we learned that combustion of potassium yielded the lowest wavelengths, while the combustion of sodium yielded the highest wavelengths. Introduction: The purpose of Experiment four is to understand how quantum mechanics work. This experiment helps better understand the light phenomenon and its concepts. Using spectroscopes and gratings we can diffract light and separate electromagnetic radiation. Separating electromagnetic radiation can help determine the grating constant of a replica grating. Using a spectroscope with a grating, we can test Bohr’s and Schrödinger’s model for the hydrogen atom. Diffraction is the opposite of refraction. Refraction is bending light to separate individual colors, while diffraction is
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY 1310 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '10 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lab Report - Experiment 4 Quantum Mechanics Windows to Atomic Structure Arghaya Dalapati Lab Partner Nate Young Section I2 TA Arren Washington

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