The Critique of the Kalam Argument

The Critique of the Kalam Argument - Jack Rohal Philosophy...

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Jack Rohal Philosophy of Religion Dr. Groe February 1 st , 2010 The Critique of the Kalam Argument. The Kalam argument is a surprisingly simple cosmological argument for the existence of God. The Kalam argument states that 1. Whatever begins to exist has a cause, 2. The universe began to exist. 3. Therefore, the universe has a cause. This cause then must be transcendent, unimaginably powerful and have a personal will. This argument was favored and promoted by William Craig. The power of this argument is in the simple logical reasoning that it uses. You have to disagree with point one, or point two because the third point is the logical conclusion of the first two. Yet, this is not always true. One of the most repeated critiques that I found in my research was that the argument itself is circular. The other critiques that I found most valuable were those that were scientific and mathematic. I do not know the math well enough to fully explain the argument so I will mostly focus on the scientific critique. I will not focus on the assigned reading of Paul Draper, due to the fact that I found these arguments more understandable and thus plainly pointing out the flaws of the Kalam argument. A useful way to look at the argument is that it is just a circular argument.
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2010 for the course CS CS150 taught by Professor Anders during the Spring '10 term at Jacksonville University.

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The Critique of the Kalam Argument - Jack Rohal Philosophy...

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