Bandura - Albert Bandura (1925 - Present) Chapter 13 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 1 Albert Bandura (1925 - Present) Chapter 13 2 Albert Bandura 1. Born Dec. 4, 1925 (in Mundare) Alberta, Canada. 2. B.A. from University of British Columbia (1949). 3. PhD from University of Iowa (1952). 4. Postdoctoral at Wichita Guidance Center, 1953. (1925-present) 3 Albert Bandura 5. Joined Stanford University after 1953 and is still there. 6. Wrote his first book with Richard Walters, Adolescent Aggression , in 1959. 7. President American Psychological Association (1974). (1925-present)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 4 Albert Bandura 8. Holds offices in many scientific societies. Serves on editorial boards of 17 journals. 9. Influenced by Spence, and by Miller and Dollard’s book, Social Learning and Imitation (1941). (1925-present) 5 Albert Bandura 10. APA’s Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (1980). He continues to work at Stanford to this day. (1925-present) 6 Imitative Behavior: History 1. Plato and Aristotle, thought that students learn from teachers who serve as models, and thus believed that humans have an innate tendency to imitate. 2. Since the idea of innateness prevailed in thinking about imitation no experimentation was carried out to find whether this was true or not.
Background image of page 2
3 7 1. Thorndike (1998) placed a trained and a naïve cat in adjoining cages. Naïve cat did not learn to escape through imitating the trained cat. It had to learn to escape the box by trial and error. 2. Watson (1908) also tried training monkeys through imitation with little luck. 3. Conclusions : Animals learn through direct experience, and not through imitation or observing others. 8 Miller and Dollard 1. Miller and Dollard (1941), challenged the nativist view of imitative behavior, and argued that imitative behavior can be explained on the basis of instrumental conditioning. 2. Dollard and Miller divided imitative behavior into three categories. 3. When two individuals respond to the same situation, in the same way, e.g., stop at red light, laugh with others, applaud with others etc. we call that same behavior. 9 Miller and Dollard 4. When one person guides another in developing a behavior is called copy behavior , e.g., an art teacher assists his student to paint or draw. 5. When an observer blindly follows a model it is called matched-dependent behavior e.g., “when in Rome, do as the Romans do”. Doing every thing like the model under wide variety of situations is called generalized imitation .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 10 Conclusions: Behaviorists 1. Observational learning does not takes place all the time. 2. Model’s behavior is observed. 3. Observer matches model’s behavior (works as discriminative operant). 4. Matching behavior (response) is reinforced. 5. A schedule of reinforcement is required to maintain this behavior. The following conclusions are drawn by Miller and
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course PSY 2533 taught by Professor Ahmad during the Fall '09 term at Henderson.

Page1 / 16

Bandura - Albert Bandura (1925 - Present) Chapter 13 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online