{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Early Beginnings to Modern Times

Early Beginnings to Modern Times - Learning Early...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 1 Learning: Early Beginnings to Modern Times Chapter 3 2 Epistemology Epistemology is a branch of philosophy that deals with the nature of knowledge and seeks answers to questions below. Epistemology is a philosopher’s way of looking at learning. What is knowledge? What are the limits of knowledge? What are the origins of knowledge? How is knowledge acquired (learning)? 3 Socrates (470-399 BC) filipinaatheist.files.wordpress.com Theory of Knowledge Knowledge is acquired through disciplined conversation (dialectics). Disciplined conversation requires ideas be consistently clarified through dialogue.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 4 Problems 1. Conversations, in defining ideas can lead to confusions rather than clarity. 2. Such confusions arise due to different perspectives people may hold especially with abstract definitions, that are hard to define in the first place. People stick to particular cases when defining abstract ideas, e.g., beautiful flower and not the idea of beauty. 5 Plato (447-327 BC) www.poems.net.au Innateness of Knowledge Plato student of Socrates, believed in the innateness of knowledge. Human mind possessed knowledge. To acquire knowledge, humans must reflect on the contents of the mind. 6 Plato (447-327 BC) www.poems.net.au Innateness of Knowledge Self-exiled himself to Italy after Socrates execution and joined Pythagoras. Pythagoras suggested that universe was dualistic. Plato proposed mind-body dualism, and said that mind affected the body, but the body could not affect the mind.
Image of page 2
3 7 Aristotle (384-322 BC) www.martinfrost.ws Knowledge through Experience Aristotle student of Plato, believed that sensory information was the basis of all knowledge (experience). Attainment of knowledge was through mind, which interconnects ideas . All forms of sensory information result in mental ideas. 8 Aristotle (384-322 BC) www.martinfrost.ws Aristotle’s Laws Laws of Association a. Similarity (lemon-lime) b. Contrast (night-day) c. Contiguity (table-chair) Law of Frequency If two events are experienced repeatedly, presentation of one will lead to the recall of other.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern