Hebb - Donald O Hebb(1904 1985 Chapter 14 1 Donald O Hebb 1 Born Jul 22 1904 in Chester Nova Scotia 2 B.A from Dalhousie University with lowest GPA

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1 1 Donald O. Hebb (1904 - 1985) Chapter 14 2 Donald O. Hebb 1. Born Jul. 22, 1904 in Chester, Nova Scotia. 2. B.A. from Dalhousie University with lowest GPA. 3. Went to McGill for his masters and completed it in 1932. 4. Did not think Pavlovian conditioning had much value. (1904-1985) www.ecs.soton.ac.uk 3 Donald O. Hebb 5. In 1934, read Kohler’s Gestalt Psychology and Karl Lashley’s work on brain physiology. 6. In 1936, entered PhD program at Harvard under Lashley. 7. In 1942 joined Lashley at the Yerkes Laboratory of Primate Biology, in Florida. (1904-1985)
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2 4 Donald O. Hebb 8. In 1948, accepted an appointment as a professor at McGill University and remained there till retirement. 9. Wrote Organization of Behavior (1949). 10. After retirement went back to Nova Scotia and died on Aug 20, 1985. (1904-1985) www.ecs.soton.ac.uk 5 Behaviorists and Brain 1. Behaviorists like Watson, Thorndike, and Hull argued that brain was merely a complex switchboard, that connected sensory events in certain regions of the brain to motor events. 2. Learning involved changes in neural circuitry so that stimulation now activated areas of the brain other than originally stimulated by sensory events. 3. If a part of the brain and connections between sensory and motor events were to be severed. Learning would be disrupted. 6 Karl Lashley 1. Born 1890, Davis, West Virginia. 2. Did his PhD in genetics at Johns Hopkins University, and was associated with John Watson. 3. In 1920 became an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota (1890-1958) isites.harvard.edu
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3 7 Karl Lashley 4. He became a professor at the University of Chicago (1929-35), Harvard University (1935-55) and finally director of the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology Florida (1942-55.) 5. Died in 1958. (1890-1958) isites.harvard.edu 8 Lashley and Brain 1. Lashley’s research expressed serious doubts on the idea that brain was a switchboard. 2. He showed that after learning (discrimination), certain brain areas could be destroyed, and yet the animal would relearn the task. 9 Lashley and Brain 3. The amount of brain destroyed was directly associated with disruption of learning came to be known as the principle of mass action. 4. Lashley (1950) also concluded that cortex functions as a whole. And that if one part of the brain is destroyed another takes over, called principle of equipotentiality . 5. Under Lashley’s patronage Hebb developed most of his thinking and ideas.
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4 10 Wilder Penfield Hebb worked with Penfield at the Montreal Neurological Institute, and found that recovering patients with substantial loss of frontal cortex (20%), showed no loss in intelligence. www-tc.pbs.org
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course PSY 2533 taught by Professor Ahmad during the Fall '09 term at Henderson.

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Hebb - Donald O Hebb(1904 1985 Chapter 14 1 Donald O Hebb 1 Born Jul 22 1904 in Chester Nova Scotia 2 B.A from Dalhousie University with lowest GPA

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