Spatial Vision

Spatial Vision - 3 3 Spatial Vision Chapter 3 Spatial...

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3 Spatial Vision Chapter 3 3 Spatial Vision • Visual Acuity: Oh Say, Can You See? • Retinal Ganglion Cells and Stripes • The Lateral Geniculate Nucleus • Striate Cortex • Receptive Fields in the Striate Cortex • Columns and Hypercolumns • Selective Adaptation: The Psychologist’s Electrode • The Girl Who Almost Couldn’t See Stripes 3 Visual Acuity: Oh Say, Can You See? The King said, “I haven’t sent the two Messengers, either. They’re both gone to the town. Just look along the road, and tell me if you can see either of them.” “I see nobody on the road,” said Alice. “I only wish I had such eyes,” the King remarked in a fretful tone. “To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance, too!” —Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass
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3 Visual Acuity How do we process images from our eyeballs to our brain? To do that we need to understand a few basic concepts. Contrast: The difference in illumination between a figure and its background. 3 Visual Acuity Acuity: The smallest spatial detail that can be resolved. 3 Visual Acuity Measuring visual acuity: – Eye doctors use distance (e.g., 20/20). – Vision scientists use the smallest visual angle of a cycle of grating.
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3 Sine Wave Gratings The visual system “samples” the grating discretely. 3 Visual Acuity Herman Snellen invented method for designating visual acuity in 1862. 3 Visual Acuity: Oh Say, Can You See? (cont’d) Spatial Frequency: The number of cycles of a grating per unit of visual angle (usually specified in degrees).
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3 Visual Acuity: Oh Say, Can You See? (cont’d) Cycles per degree: The number of dark and bright bars per degree of visual angle. 3
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course PSY 4283 taught by Professor Ahmad during the Fall '09 term at Henderson.

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Spatial Vision - 3 3 Spatial Vision Chapter 3 Spatial...

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