CH369.lecture9 - C hapte 10 r GlucoseMe tabolism Figure...

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Figure 10.01 Yeast cells. Chapter 10 Glucose Metabolism
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Which glycolytic reactions consume ATP? ->>A) hexokinase B) pyruvate kinase [generates ATP] C) enolase D) A and B E) all of the above Which generate ATP?
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A phosphorylated glucose molecule can pass the glucose transporter freely. A) True B) - >False Under whatever, it is converted to lactic acid
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Introduction of glucose Glucose is the most abundant organic molecule on earth. It plays a central role in metabolism in all living cells. It can serve as a precursor for other biomolecules. It provides energy. In some organisms, such as protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, it is the only energy producing pathway. • Glucose can be converted to ethanol and CO 2 in yeast Beer!
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In this chapter Glycolysis - The conversion of the 6- carbon glucose to the 3-carbon pyruvate (10 steps reaction); Gluconeogenesis – synthesis of glucose (11) Glycogenolysis – glycogen degradation Glycogenesis - glycogen synthesis Pentose phosphate pathway
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Multi-step metabolism 1. Each step of the pathway is catalyzed by a distinct enzyme. 2. The free energy consumed or released in certain reactions is transferred by molecules such as ATP and NADH. 3. The rate of the pathway can be controlled by altering the activity of individual enzymes.
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Advantages of a multi-step reaction Cells have higher control over the reaction X Y X A B Y Slower release of energy in smaller and useful quantity Combustion Glucose CO + H O
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Representation of glucose structure.
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Cellulose fibers in a plant cell wall contain b (1-4) glycosidic bonds
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Glucose residues are linked by glycosidic bonds in starch, glycogen, and cellulose. α(1 4) bond β(1 4) bond Breaks down by glycogen Breaks down by cellulase phosphorylase Starch, glycogen Cellulose
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Structure of glycogene. α 1,4 bond α 1,6 bond
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Glycogenolysis (liver or muscles) Blood In liver Only!
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Only the glycogen in liver can raise blood glucose level.
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course CH 369 taught by Professor Kbrowning during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas.

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CH369.lecture9 - C hapte 10 r GlucoseMe tabolism Figure...

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