Oscillatory Motion and Energy Conservation

Oscillatory Motion and Energy Conservation - PHY 221 Lab...

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PHY 221 Lab 10 Oscillatory Motion and Energy Conservation Leader: Critic: Scribe: Goals : In this lab we will experiment with oscillatory motion, including its period, amplitude and energy. . Materials: PC based data acquisition system, including sonic ranger Brass spring, 0.2 kg mass Activity: 1. Oscillatory motion A simple harmonic motion can be obtained by suspending a mass on a spring. Hang a spring from the metal bar over your lab bench. Hang the 0.2 kg mass from the spring, and position the sonic ranger underneath it, looking up. Wake up Logger Pro using the shortcut to &week10&. Adjust things as necessary so that you can make reliable measurements of the height of the mass. Make one recording of the mass just sitting still. Note the position x 0 of the mass as given by the sonic ranger. What is it? &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& x 0 = Then, displace the mass downward by a few centimeters, let go, and then start recording data for 5 seconds. It is convenient to use displacement of the mass from this neutral position x d =x-x 0 instead of Page 1 of 11 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/oscillatory-motion.html
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the position x itself. Go to &Data& menu and select &New Column&, then &Formula& from the sub-menu. Type in &xd& for &Long name&, then click on &Definition&. From &variable& drop-down menu select &Distance&. You should now see it in the &Equation& line. Complete the equation by typing in a minus sign and the value of x 0 that you obtained above. Click &OK& which will close the variable definition dialog. You should now see &xd& displayed instead of &Distance& on your graph. If you don&t, click on &Distance& label in the Distance vs. Time graph. In the pop-out window select &xd& and deselect &Distance&.& The other graph should still show Velocity vs. Time. What can you say about coincidence in time of minimum or maximum and zero between velocity and xd? Make a sketch of the displacement and velocity of the mass versus time. Page 2 of 11 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/oscillatory-motion.html
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Both displacement and velocity are described by sin (or cos ) functions in harmonic oscillations. Time structure of such oscillations is often characterized by quantity called period . The period, T , is the time required for the object to go through one full cycle of its motion. That is, after a time equal to T the object comes back to the same position and velocity. Notice that the object already comes back to its initial position after time T/2, however its velocity is reversed at that time moment. Determine period of the oscillations from xd vs t graph. Use &Examine& tool from &Analyze& menu for more accurate reading of numbers from the graph. Instead of measuring time for one full cycle of motion, measure time for as many full cycles as appear on your screen and then divide by the number of cycles. This will minimize the measurement
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHY221 taught by Professor Tomaszskwarnicki during the Spring '10 term at Syracuse.

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Oscillatory Motion and Energy Conservation - PHY 221 Lab...

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