F=ma - PHY 221 Lab#1 Introduction to Measurements Page 1 of...

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PHY 221 Lab 6 F=ma Leader: Critic: Scribe: Goals : Newton's 2 nd Law is perhaps the most important equation you will learn in physics. In this lab, you will explore some applications of this beautiful and powerful idea. We will also become more familiar with frictional force. Materials: PC with ULI interface for measuring instruments PASCO Motion Sensor (connected to Port 2) Force Probe (connected to DIN 1) PASCO cart on aluminum tracks with bracket to fix the force probe on the cart PASCO cart without the mounting bracket Two rectangular weights for the cart Balance to measure masses String Activity: 1. Discovering Newton&s 2 nd Law Set the cart with the force probe on the track, with the hook of the force probe facing away from the sonic ranger. The force probe should be set to 10N range. Page 1 of 9 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/fma.html
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Start the program by clicking on the shortcut for &week6&. You should see four graphs; position vs. time, position vs. force, velocity vs. force, and acceleration vs. force. Make sure that the sonic ranger detects the cart along the track. Zero the force probe by going to &Experiment& menu and clicking on &Zero&. Then click on &Zero Force&. Start collecting data. Grab the cart by holding on to the sensitive hook on the force probe, and start moving the cart back and forth. Make motion irregular i.e. don&t repeat the same pattern over and over again. Try to apply the largest force you can without derailing the cart. For example, give a cart sudden, but short pull. Then suddenly push it back. Remember to apply the force to the force probe hook only. Copy graphs of position vs. force, velocity vs. force, and acceleration vs. force to your report. Note on your sketches what the scale is, and especially where the value 0 is. Is position a simple function of force? Is velocity a simple function of force? Page 2 of 9 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/fma.html
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Is acceleration a simple function of force? What kind of function could it be? What does Newton&s 2 nd Law predict for function dependence of acceleration on force? Does your data agree with this expectation? From Newton&s 2 nd law, what should be the slope of the acceleration vs force dependence?
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHY221 taught by Professor Tomaszskwarnicki during the Spring '10 term at Syracuse.

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F=ma - PHY 221 Lab#1 Introduction to Measurements Page 1 of...

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