Uniform Motion - PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PHY 221 Lab 3 Uniform Motion Leader: Critic: Scribe: Goals : To expand your understanding of kinematical variables& (position, velocity, acceleration) we will consider special types of motion in which one, or more variables are constant. Materials: Metal angle bracket PC with ULI interface for measuring instruments PASCO Motion Sensor (also known as a "sonic ranger") PASCO cart on aluminum tracks Meter stick (Activity 5). Rectangular weight (Activity 6). Activity: 1. Constant position.& An object at rest doesn&t move. Yet all kinematical variables: position, velocity and acceleration can still be measured. Thus, being at rest is just a very special type of motion. To Page 1 of 8 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/uniform-motion.html
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
investigate motion with constant position , click on the shortcut for &week3&. You should see three graphs; position vs. time, velocity vs. time and acceleration vs. time. Make sure that the sonic ranger detects the cart all along the track. Collect data for the cart at rest. Copy the three graphs to your report. Indicate values of each kinematical variable in the vertical axis. A measurement process always carries some inaccuracies called measurement errors. They may show up as oscillations of the measured value around the true value, fluctuating with time. Taking into account possible measurement errors answer the following questions: Is position constant with time? Is velocity constant with time? Is acceleration constant with time? Let us now quantify what the values of position, velocity and acceleration are. Instead of reading off values of these quantities at one particular time moment we can average the measurements for different times (as long as we believe that the quantities are constant). The averaging procedure results in much smaller measurement errors. This can be easily accomplished in our program by using the &STAT& button. It is useful to exclude the initial and final time moments from your graph while averaging, since they tend to have larger measurement errors. To measure position within selected time range, left-click on the position vs. time graph with the pointer positioned at the lowest time you want to include in the average (the pointer should be within the rectangular area defined by the graph axes), hold the mouse button down and stretch the selection range to the largest time to be included in the average. Vertical bars superimposed on the graph, connected by horizontal dashed lines, will indicate the selected range. If you are not happy with the selection just repeat the procedure. To average the position measurements within the select range click on the button. The average Page 2 of 8 PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to Measurements 12/28/2009 http://physics.syr.edu/courses/PHY221.07Spring/manuals/uniform-motion.html
Background image of page 2
value (called also &mean&) will be displayed in small box superimposed on the graph. What is the average position value? &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& X =
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

Uniform Motion - PHY 221 Lab #1: Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online